Learn How To Speak Football!

Our friends over at Kaplan International have done it again!. For all of you football (I mean European football) fans, now you can learn how to use the important vocabulary of this exciting game! Check out their website here, where you can see more info in English about football and the upcoming World Cup!

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4 Ways To Use the Word Barbecue in English – Vocabulary Lesson

4 Ways To Use the Word Barbecue in English - Vocabulary Lesson

I have a gas barbecue. I love to use it because I think barbecued food tastes better than food cooked in the kitchen. In my family, we barbecue all year round. In the winter, I clear the snow off the barbecue and start cooking. We often invite friends over for a barbecue in the summer. Everyone enjoys spending time outside on a nice day eating deliciously barbecued food!

For today’s English lesson, I want to show you four ways we use the word barbecue in English. Have a look at the paragraph above once more, and then check the lesson below.

  1. Barbecue is a verb. It means to cook food on an outside grill
    1. I barbecued the steaks and sausages for dinner.
    2. Do you like to barbecue in the summer time?
    3. Jane cooks in the kitchen, but Jack barbecues in the backyard
  2. Barbecue is a noun that means an outside grill:
    1. We bought a new barbecue last summer. It’s easy to use.
    2. Do you prefer a gas or charcoal barbecue?
    3. Yoshi has a portable barbecue that he uses on camping trips.
  3. Barbecue as a noun is also used to mean an outdoor party where food is cooked on an outside grill. Note that we usually don’t say, barbecue party because the word barbecue by itself means party.
    1. Joe is having a big barbecue at his house to celebrate his 50th birthday.
    2. I went to a barbecue last night and pigged out on hotdogs.
    3. We were invited to two different barbecues on the Fourth of July.
  4. Lastly, we use the past participle, barbecued as an adjective to describe food which is cooked on an outside grill:
    1. The kids really love to eat barbecued corn.
    2. My friend Paul likes to make barbecued pizza!
    3. Yakitori is barbecued chicken on a stick.

If you know anyone who has trouble with this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!

 



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How To Use Matter – Confusing English Vocabulary

Several of my students have asked me about the word matter and how to use it, so for today’s English lesson, let’s have a look at both the noun and verb form of this word.

As a noun, we generally use matter in a question or negative sentence. Matter means problem or trouble:

  • What’s the matter with the computer?
  • I don’t know what the matter with Jane is. She seems down today.

We usually don’t use the matter in a positive sentence. Look at this conversation:

  • What’s the matter with the computer?
  • I think the problem is the hard drive. Not, I think the matter is the hard drive.

So to answer “What’s the matter~” you can say things like “The problem is~” or  “The issue is~” etc.

As a verb we generally use matter in questions or negative sentences, but it can be used in positive sentences. Matter means, important or significant.

  • Jim: Does it matter where we have lunch today?
  • Jen: It doesn’t matter where we go, as long as it’s not fast food.

Here is another example:

  • Everything she says matters to me because I value her opinions.

There are other uses of matter as well:

Matter as a noun means physical substance and this meaning is often used in science:

  • There has been no organic matter found on the moon.
  • In physics calls, the students learned about inorganic matter.

Matter also means written or printed material like books and newspapers, but this usage is a bit formal:

  • I have prepared some reading matter for class today.
  • That company deals with digitizing printed matter.

As a noun, matter also means an issue or situation being considered or discussed.

  • The marketing problem? We discussed the matter all morning.
  • I am aware that John’s performance is not good and I have already reviewed the matter with the boss.

Well, I hope you found this lesson helpful. How about writing a few sentences using matter in the comment box below? I’ll review them for you!

If you know anyone who has trouble with this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!
 



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