Famous, Popular, Notorious – Confusing English Word Lesson

Famous, Popular, Notorious - Confusing English Word Lesson

Times Square is both famous and popular!

There are many famous sightseeing places in New York City. Some of the most popular ones are Times Square, the Statue of Liberty, and the Empire State Building. Just twenty-fine years ago, Times Square was notorious as a gathering place of drug dealers and prostitutes, but now it is the most popular place for families to visit. One of the nice but les famous spots that I like is the rooftop of the Metropolitan Museum (the MET). It’s got a great view of Central Park!

For today’s free English Lesson, we are going to look at two words that are often confused, famous and popular, and I will also show you a related word, notorious. Have a look at the paragraph above once more and then check the lesson.

When something or someone is famous, it or they are well known, in other words many people know it or them:

  • There are many famous sightseeing places in New York City.
  • Johnny Depp is a famous actor.
  • The Magnolia Bakery is famous for it’s cupcakes.

When something or someone is popular, it or they are liked by many people. Popular things and people are admired and/or enjoyed by many people:

  • Times Square is a popular place for families to visit.
  • Star Wars was released in the 1970’s,. but it is still popular.
  • Dance clubs are popular with college students.

On the other hand, notorious people or places are well know for something bad, a bad quality or in the case of a notorious person, a bad action:

  • Times Square was notorious as a gathering place of drug dealers and prostitutes
  • Adolf Hitler was one of the most notorious historical figures of the twentieth century.
  • The Godfather movie depicts several notorious gangsters of the 1940’s in New York.

Now it’s your turn. How about writing a few sentences using this vocabulary in the comment box below? I’ll review them for you!

If you know anyone who has trouble with this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!

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8 Phrases That Use Look – English Vocabulary Lesson

8 Ways To Use Look - English Vocabulary Lesson

She’s looking at you!

Look is an interesting verb in English. You probably know that we use look at when we use our intention, and the object of looking doesn’t move. For example, we:

  • Look at a photo
  • Look at a clock
  • Look at a flower

For today’s free English Lesson, I am going to show you 8 other common uses of the verb look.

Look at also means to examine or consider something:

  • We are looking at a new marketing plan.
  • Jack said he’s looking at buying a new car.

Look around means to move around in a place in order to view what is available there:

  • I was looking around the mall with my sister.
  • Let’s look around Chinatown. There are many interesting shops there.

Look for means search or try to find:

  • I’m looking for Jack. Have you seen him?
  • We have been looking for new office space.

Look into means to investigate something in detail:

  • The bank director was looking into the missing money.
  • The police detective is going to look into the suspect’s background.

Look like means resemble:

  • Jack looks like his father.
  • This desk looks like the desk I used in elementary school.

Look through means to peruse, and we usually look through a book, a catalog, or other printed matter:

  • I was looking through the Ikea catalog for some new living room furniture.
  • I like to look through cook books when I want to make dinner.

Look to + noun means to rely on someone for help or to do something:

  • I look to Gloria to help me with editing my books.
  • Jack looks to his boss assistance when he has trouble with a customer.

Look + infinitive (to verb) means to expect or hope to do something:

  • I am look to find a new apartment.
  • The company is looking to expand its operation in Asia.

Now it’s your turn. How about writing a few sentences using this vocabulary in the comment box below? I’ll review them for you!

If you know anyone who has trouble with this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!

 



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12 Different Ways to Use “Take” in English Conversation

12 Different Ways to Use “Take” in English Conversation

I take the train every morning to my office. I generally take the same train every morning. I had a headache on the train this morning so I took some medicine and fell asleep. I hope nobody took my photo! When I got to the office I took out my keyboard and mouse and started working. I took my pen in my hand and started working on lessons.

For today’s free English Lesson, we are going to look at several common uses of the verb take. Have a look at the paragraph above and then check the lesson. Note that take is an irregular verb so the three forms are take, took (past) and taken (past participle):

The basic meaning of take is to get into your hands or to reach out and told something:

  • Take my hand and let’s walk on the beach together.
  • Can I take this pen?
  • Ok. Let’s move the desk. You take that side, and I’ll take this side.

Take also has the meaning of to remove something or a person from a certain place. We often use take out or take away:

  • He took his wallet out and paid for lunch.
  • Please take out a pen or a pencil. It’s time for a quiz!
  • The police took the suspect to the station for questioning.

Take also means to chose or select:

  • I’ll take a double cheese burger and a side of fries.
  • There are so many nice pens in the display case. I think I’ll take the blue one.
  • I baked a lot of cookies, so you can take as many as you like.

We also use take to mean swallow or drink medicine:

  • The doctor said to take aspirin for a headache.
  • How many spoonfuls of this cough medicine should I take?
  • Take one tablet three times a day.

Take also means to ride, when we talk about transportation.

  • I take the commuter train every morning.
  • If you want to go to Boston, you can take a train or a plane from New York.
  • Let’s take the express bus today.

We also use take to mean steal:

  • Someone took my pen!
  • The office was robbed and they took three computers.
  • I keep my bicycle locked, so I am sure nobody will take it.

We use be or get taken to mean deceived or cheated:

  • If you see people playing the shell game on the street, don’t bet your money. You’ll surely get taken.
  • The man said this was a new camera, but I was taken. It’s actually used.

We can say that someone is taken. It means that person is married or already in a romantic relationship:

  • She’s a nice girl. It’s too bad she’s taken.
  • I was talking to him for an hour before I realized he was taken.

There are also many things you can take in English:

  • If you want to remember what the teacher says, you should take notes.
  • The doctor can take your temperature measure your body temperature or take your blood pressure measure your blood pressure.
  • If you want to have visual memories of an event, you can take a photo.

Now it’s your turn. How about writing a few sentences using this vocabulary in the comment box below? I’ll review them for you!

If you know anyone who has trouble with this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!

 



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