91 – Take Lunch vs Have Lunch – Confusing English Words

91 - Take Lunch vs Have Lunch - Confusing English Words

I took lunch at 3pm, and I had fried dumplings!

The sentences I take lunch & I have lunch have a completely different meaning in English. For today’s English lesson, I’m going to show how to use take & have naturally in your English conversations. Check it out!

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Here are the example sentences:

Have is used to mean eat or drink:

  • Let’s have some ice cream. It’s so hot outside.
  • Do you want to have beer or wine?
  • I feel like having some coffee.

You can also use for:

  • I had a bagel for breakfast.
  • I sometimes have pasta for lunch.
  • Jack said his family usually has pizza on Fridays for dinner.

Using take:

  • Jack always takes lunch at 12:30.

We also use the phrase take a break:

  • I took a break at 3:00 and walked to the bank.
  • Let’s take a break. We’ve been working in the garden for three hours.

These sentences are not natural in English:

  • I took a cup of coffee before starting work. It should be, “I had a cup of coffee…”
  • I took some tea and a cookie for dessert. It should be, “I had some tea and a cookie…”
Yesterday’s listening challenge answer:
  • Michael ate a pan fried grasshopper once!
Today’s listening challenge:
  • What did Michael have for lunch today. Was there anything different between today’s lunch and Michael’s usual lunch these days?

If you know anyone who has trouble with this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!

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81 – Taste vs. Flavor – Confusing English Words

happy-english-lesson-taste-vs-flavor

This dish has a wonderful flavor!

Taste & flavor are both nouns and verbs with similar meanings, but we use them differently. For today’s English podcast lesson, let’s have a look at how we use taste & flavor in Everyday English.
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Here are the example sentences:

Taste as a noun:

  • Too much salt will ruin the taste of that steak.
  • I like the taste of that ice cream.
  • Jane’s homemade yogurt has a very nice taste.

Taste as a verb:

  • Thai curry tastes delicious.
  • Chocolate and potato chips taste great together.
  • Some people say that rabbit tastes like chicken.

Taste meaning sense:

  • I like Jane’s taste in fashion.
  • Jackie has good taste in interior decoration.
  • Jack has good taste in shoes.

Flavor as a noun:

  • The food in that restaurant has true Japanese flavor
  • The flavor of this pizza is just amazing.
  • I like the flavor and the texture of that yogurt.
  • Which ice cream flavor do you like – chocolate or vanilla?
  • This soda comes in several flavors, including cherry, orange, and grape.

Flavor as a verb:

  • The chef flavors the soup with salt and bay leaves.
  • My mom flavors her pasta sauce with garlic.
Yesterday’s listening challenge answer:
  • This fall, Michael is thinking of taking a vacation.
Today’s listening challenge:
  • What kind of food is Michael into these days? Do you like it?

If you know anyone who has trouble with this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!

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Do you want to learn 365 American English Idioms? Get my book. You can download it below (a pdf) or get it for your mobile device or in paperback @ Amazon!

 

Check out my eBooks & Paperbacks @ Amazon.com  ►► Get my FREE iPhone / iPad APP  ►► eBooks on iTunes  ►► eBooks on Google Play  ►► eBooks on Kobo for Sony Reader ►►

80 – Seem vs Suppose – Confusing English Words Lesson

I suppose Jenny really loves her cat!

I suppose Jenny really loves her cat!

Seem & suppose are similar words, but they are used differently. For today’s English lesson, I’m going to show you how to use these words in your English conversation and writing.

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Here are the example sentences:

Seem:

  • She said that I seemed a little tired. (This means she had a feeling that I was tired.)
  • Even though I put in long hours, it never seems long. (I never feel as if I am working a lot.)
  • The boss seems angry today. (I sense that the boss is angry.)
  • My dog Happy seems tired today.
  • I gave Jane her birthday present and she seemed happy with it.
  • I finished the report. Does it seem correct to you?
  • My dog Happy seems to be in heaven when she is taking a nap.
  • This train seems to be full. Let’s take the next one.
  • I finished the report. Does it seem to be correct to you?

Suppose:

  • I suppose I was tired.
  • It never feels like work. I suppose that’s because I enjoy my job.
  • It’s raining hard, so I suppose there will be traffic.
  • I suppose that she didn’t get much sleep last night.
  • I suppose she is my guard dog!
  • Do you suppose the supermarket is open late tonight?
Yesterday’s listening challenge answer:
  • Friday is a busier day for Michael because he has a meeting in the morning, a few lesson appointments in the afternoon and then plans with his friends to meet for a party
Today’s listening challenge:
  • What are Michael’s plans for the Autumn?

If you know anyone who has trouble with this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!

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Do you have question about English? Are you confused about something in English? Just click the Ask me a question button on the left side of the screen and record your message. I’ll answer all voice messages in a future podcast![/container] [/content_band]

Do you want to learn 365 American English Idioms? Get my book. You can download it below (a pdf) or get it for your mobile device or in paperback @ Amazon!

 

Check out my eBooks & Paperbacks @ Amazon.com  ►► Get my FREE iPhone / iPad APP  ►► eBooks on iTunes  ►► eBooks on Google Play  ►► eBooks on Kobo for Sony Reader ►►