English Grammar Mini-Quiz: Phrasal Verbs

Do you know the rule about using phrasal verbs? Have a look at the quiz, and answer the question in the comment box below.
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English Grammar Quiz – Frequency Adverbs

Take a look at the quiz below and write your answers in the comment box

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English Lesson & Quiz: Using Too

This Thai curry was too spicy!

It’s pretty cold here in New York today. For me, it’s too cold. And it’s raining, which I guess is better than snow. Last winter there was too much snow, and too many snow storms. Because we had a cold winter last year, the snow melted too slowly. So far this winter it has only snowed once. I love the warmer weather, but spring is too far away. There is too much time between now and the warm days of spring in New York.

We use too to talk about situations where there is more (or sometimes less) of something than what we want or need. Do you know how to use this word? Have a look at the paragraph above and then check out today’s lesson.

We use too to show that there is more (or sometimes less) of something than what we want or need. If you use too, it shows that you are not satisfied about that situation, so too is often used when we complain. There are three patterns that you’ll need to memorize, so let’s look at these patterns and some examples:

Pattern #1. Use too + adjective. Too works like very – it makes the adjective’s meaning stronger. However, the nuance is that you are not satisfied and/or complaining about the situation. Let’s compare too and very:

  • It’s very cold today. This just means it is quite cold.
  • It’s too cold today.  This means it is quite cold and the speaker is not happy about that situation.

Here are some more examples:

  • I can’t go to the gym today because I’m too tired.
  • Emily wanted to go there, but she said it was too far.
  • I don’t like the color you used to paint the room. It’s too dark.

Pattern #2. In a similar way as Pattern #1, we use too + adverb:

  • The snow melted too slowly.
  • The new teacher speaks too quickly.
  • Traffic is moving too slowly this morning.

If you want to emphasize your feeling, you can use much + too + adjective & much + too + adverb” Here are some examples:

  • I can’t go to the gym today because I’m much too tired.
  • Emily wanted to go there, but she said it was much too far.
  • I don’t like the color you used to paint the room. It’s much too dark.
  • The snow melted much too slowly.
  • The new teacher speaks much too quickly.
  • Traffic is moving much too slowly this morning.

Pattern #3. Use too + many + countable noun & too + much + non-countable noun. Here are some examples:

  • There were too many snow storms.
  • Nicole said she has too many bills to pay this month.
  • Last winter there was too much snow.
  • There is too much time between now and the warm days of spring in New York.

Thanks for studying with me today. Can you remember the four patterns? Check yourself with this quiz:

 

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