English Lesson & Quiz: Using Already & Yet

The train hasn't arrived yet

I’ve had a busy day. It’s just 9am now, but I have already done so much. I have prepared my lessons, checked Facebook, Twitter, and Weibo, and made breakfast. Of course, I have already taken Happy for a walk. I was planning to go to the gym, but I haven’t gone yet. Maybe I’ll go this afternoon.

We use already and yet with present perfect. Do you know how to use these words? Have a look at the paragraph above, and then check out today’s lesson:

We use already with the present prefect to show that something was completed before the time of speaking. Note that already generally comes between have and the main verb.

  • It’s just 9am now, but I have already done so much.
  • I have already taken Happy for a walk.

We use yet with the present prefect to show that something was not completed before the time of speaking. Note that yet comes at the end of the sentence.

  • I was planning to go to the gym, but I haven’t gone yet.
  • The train hasn’t arrived yet.

We use both already and yet when we ask questions using present perfect. Yet has a neutral meaning. Already has a meaning that the speaker expects that something has happened. Notice the difference:

  • Has Carol heard from Jim yet? Neutral meaning
  • Has Carol already heard from Jim? The speaker expects that Carol has heard from Jim.

Is that clear? Take this quiz and check your understanding.

[mtouchquiz 8]


Check out my book:

NEW for 2012! 109 Phrasal Verbs – 116-page eBook
Including…

  • The DEFINITION of each phrasal verb.
  • How to USE the phrasal verb.
  • The STRUCTURE showing the grammar pattern of the phrasal verb.
  • EXAMPLE sentences to see how the phrasal verb is used in context.
  • A PRACTICE question to give you the chance to use the phrasal verb.

Just $5! Click here to buy it (Thank you)
Would you like a FREE 15-page sample? Click here for more information.


English Lesson & Quiz: Simple Past Vs Present Perfect

I had some delicious curry last night.

Today, let’s have a look at the difference between how to use the simple past and present perfect. Do you know how to use these tenses? Have a look at today’s lesson and then check your understanding with the quiz at the end of the lesson.

Situation #1 – Has the action finished or not?

We can use the simple past with for when the action has finished.

  • I worked at that company for 10 years. I don’t work there anymore.
  • Steve lived in Miami for three months. Steve doesn’t live there anymore.

We can use present perfect with for or since when the action has not finished.

  • I have worked at that company for 10 years. I still work there.
  • Steve has lived in Miami for three months. Steve still lives there.

Situation #2 – Is the time specific or not?

We can use the simple past when we know the specific time.  

  • I ate some delicious curry last night.
  • Steve lived in Miami last year.

We can use present perfect when we don’t know the specific time.

  • I have seen Casablanca many times. We know his experience, but we don’t know when.
  • Steve has lived in Miami and Mexico City. We know his experience, but we don’t know when.

Situation #3 – Has the time period ended or not?

We can use the simple past when the time period has finished  

  • I saw Casablanca last night. Last night has finished.
  • Steve lived in Miami last year. Last year has finished.

We can use present perfect when the time period has not finished.

  • I have seen Casablanca twice this week. This week has not finished.
  • Steve has lived in Miami all his life. All his life means Steve is still living, the time period “all his life” has not finished.

Situation #4 – Is this recent information, or old information

We can use the simple past when we talk about some old news:

  • I saw Casablanca when I lived in Miami.
  • Steve moved away from New York when he went to college.

We can use present perfect when we talk about some recent news, and we often use words like “again” or “recently” when we do:  

  • I have seen Casablanca again.
  • Steve has moved back to Mexico City recently.

[mtouchquiz 7]


NEW for 2012! 109 Phrasal Verbs – 116-page eBook
Including…

  • The DEFINITION of each phrasal verb.
  • How to USE the phrasal verb.
  • The STRUCTURE showing the grammar pattern of the phrasal verb.
  • EXAMPLE sentences to see how the phrasal verb is used in context.
  • A PRACTICE question to give you the chance to use the phrasal verb.

Just $5!
Would you like a FREE 15-page sample? Click here for more information.

English Lesson & Quiz: Ever & Never

Have you ever seen anything like this?

Have you ever been to New York City? I have been to several different countries all over the world, but there is something about the atmosphere of the Big Apple that I just love. I have never seen a city that has such a variety of people and authentic cuisines as New York. Here, you can find a restaurant from just about every country or region in the world. We even have ethnic neighborhoods such as Little Brazil, Korea Town, Little Italy, and Chinatown. If you like to eat, you’ll love Manhattan!

We use ever, before, and never along with the present perfect to talk about “any time before now.” Do you know how to use these words? Have a look at today’s lesson and then take the quiz to check your understanding.

We use ever when we ask questions using the present perfect. The structure is have [someone] ever + PP VERB. We use ever, when we are asking someone about their experience at any time in the past before now:

  • Have you ever been to New York City?
  • Has Fred ever read that book?
  • Have you ever eaten at that restaurant?

When we answer this kind of question, we do not use ever in the answer. In addition, for a negative answer, we use never.

Kathy: Have you ever been to New York City?

Larry: Yes, I have been there many times. Not, “Yes, I have ever been there many times.”

 

Danny: Has Fred ever read that book?

Janet: No, he has never read it.

Generally, in a conversation, when someone asks us a question about our experience, for positive responses we answer with the present perfect and then provide more information:

Kathy: Have you ever been to New York City?

Larry: Yes, I have been there many times. In fact, I went there twice last year on business.

 

Danny: Has Fred ever eaten Turkish food?

Janet: Yes, he has. He eats it all the time. He loves it!

Can you remember the rules? Try to check yourself with this quiz:

[mtouchquiz 6]


NEW for 2012! 109 Phrasal Verbs – 116-page eBook
Including…

  • The DEFINITION of each phrasal verb.
  • How to USE the phrasal verb.
  • The STRUCTURE showing the grammar pattern of the phrasal verb.
  • EXAMPLE sentences to see how the phrasal verb is used in context.
  • A PRACTICE question to give you the chance to use the phrasal verb.

Just $5!
Would you like a FREE 15-page sample? Click here for more information.