85 – Let It GO – Phrasal Verbs in English

let-go-phrasal-verb

Let it go or let someone go are phrasal verbs in English. For today’s English lesson, let’s have a look at what Let it go means, and how you can use it in everyday English.

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Here are the example sentences:

Let it go:

  • The queen finally didn’t need to hide her power, so she let it go.
  • The millionaire was kidnapped, but they let him go after a few hours.
  • Johnny caught a frog in his back yard, but his mother told him to let it go.
  • The boss changed the vacation policy several times, and the employees complained each time. However, the last change in the policy was not so bad, so the employees let it go.
  • Your ex-girlfriend told you that you are cheap? Just let it go. Forget about her!
  • Jenny said she hates my new haircut, but I let it go.
  • When the balloon is full of helium, tie a knot and let it go.
  • Hold this end of the rope and don’t let it go until I say “now!”
  • I held on to the dog when the guests came into the house and then let her go. She greeted everyone!

Let someone go:

  • Jack was let go when the company found out he was working part time for their competitor.
  • Because of a drop in sales, the company let ten people go.
  • Even though many tech firms are letting employees go, ABC company just hired twenty people.
Yesterday’s listening challenge answer:
  • Toward the end of today’s podcast, Michael talked about two guys. Joe works hard, and Jim hardly works. Which guy would you like as a co-worker?
Today’s listening challenge:
  • How many different ways do we use let it/something/someone go, and can you give an example of one of them?

If you know anyone who has trouble with this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!

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Do you want to learn 365 American English Idioms? Get my book. You can download it below (a pdf) or get it for your mobile device or in paperback @ Amazon!

 

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82 – Phrasal Verbs With LOOK – Learn English Vocabulary

happy-english-lesson-phrasal-verbs-look

Do you think I look like my sister?

5 phrasal verbs with look! Learning phrasal verbs in English will help to make your conversations and writing more natural sounding. For today’s English podcast lesson, let’s have a look at five different phrasal verbs based on the verb look
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Here are the example sentences:

Look for:

  • The police are looking for the bank robber.
  • I was looking for information about my ancestors online.
  • I looked for my car keys but I couldn’t find them.

Look forward to:

  • I look forward to seeing you again.
  • We are all looking forward to the party on Friday.
  • I’m looking forward to seeing my sister next week in New York.
  • Everyone is looking forward to the next podcast! (you are, right?)

Look like:

  • I think I look like my mother, and my sister looks like my father.
  • That cloud looks like an alligator.
  • Jane looks just like her sister, but they aren’t twins.

Look out for:

  • When you cross the street, look out for oncoming traffic.
  • Look out for the postman. I am expecting a package today.
  • When you drive in NYC, you have to look out for cracks and holes in the roadway.

Look up to:

  • Little Tommy looks up to his father very much.
  • I always looked up to my parents when I was a kid.
  • Children often look up to sports heros and TV characters as role models.
Yesterday’s listening challenge answer:
  • These days, Michael is really into eating Thai green curry. Do you like it too?
Today’s listening challenge:
  • Where was Michael last weekend, and why? Have you done that recently?

If you know anyone who has trouble with this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!

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Do you want to learn 365 American English Idioms? Get my book. You can download it below (a pdf) or get it for your mobile device or in paperback @ Amazon!

 

Check out my eBooks & Paperbacks @ Amazon.com  ►► Get my FREE iPhone / iPad APP  ►► eBooks on iTunes  ►► eBooks on Google Play  ►► eBooks on Kobo for Sony Reader ►►

64 – Turn Out Phrasal Verb English Lesson

phrasal-verb-turn-out-english-lesson

The party turned out great!

Turn out is phrasal verb in English. A phrasal verb is a combination of a verb and a preposition that is used as an idiom. You can also use turnout as a noun. In today’s English lesson, I’m going to show you how to use turn out and turnout in your English conversation and writing.
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Here are the example sentences:

Turn Out

  • Despite the bad weather, the party turned out great!
  • “How did your dinner meeting turn out?” “It was a big success”
  • I hope you have a good meeting with the boss. Let me know how it turns out.
  • The factory turns out hundreds of new cars every month.
  • We turned out 5 handmade rugs at the craft fair last weekend.
  • Please keep turning out those good ideas. You are really helping our marketing efforts.
  • Many people turned out to vote in the last election.
  • How many people turned out to here the CEO’s speech?
  • Only a few people turned out because of the bad weather.

Turnout

  • I am hoping for a big turnout for my yard sale on Sunday.
  • The promoter is expecting a huge turnout for the concert tomorrow.
Yesterday’s listening challenge answer:
  • (example) I will lay my pillow on the bed and lie down.
Today’s listening challenge:
  • What happened with the party that Michael planned for his friend?

If you know anyone who has trouble with this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!
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Do you want to learn 365 American English Idioms? Get my book. You can download it below (a pdf) or get it for your mobile device or in paperback @ Amazon!

 

Check out my eBooks & Paperbacks @ Amazon.com  ►► Get my FREE iPhone / iPad APP  ►► eBooks on iTunes  ►► eBooks on Google Play  ►► eBooks on Kobo for Sony Reader ►►