10 Food Related Idioms – English Vocabulary

Who brings home the bacon in your family?

Who brings home the bacon in your family?

I wanted to get a cup of joe after work today, but I’m a bit tired of the usual MegaBucks coffee shop, so I went to a new café I saw the other day. It recently opened near the station, so getting there was a piece of cake. The clerk seemed to be a bit out to lunch when he took my order, and in the end, I got a nice cup of espresso for peanuts! It was a nice treat for working hard in order to bring home the bacon!

For today’s free English Lesson, we are going to look at ten idioms that use food related words. Have a look at the paragraph above once more and then check the lesson.

A cup of joe

  • How to use it:  You can buy, drink, make, etc. a cup of joe.
  • Explanation: Joe is a slang word for coffee and so a cup of joe means a cup of coffee.
  • Example: I like to start my day with a cup of joe.

A piece of cake

  • How to use it: [something] is a piece of cake
  • Explanation: Something that is a piece of cake is easy to do.
  • Example: Using computers is a piece of cake for me.

Bring home the bacon

  • How to use it: [someone] brings home the bacon
  • Explanation: When you bring home the bacon, you support your family.
  • Example: Jack brings home the bacon.

Get something for peanuts

  • How to use it: [someone] gets [something] for peanuts
  • Explanation: When you get something for peanuts, you buy it for a low price.
  • Example: I got this new computer for peanuts!

Meat and potatoes

  • How to use it: [something] is the meat and potatoes of a situation
  • Explanation: The meat and potatoes of something is the main and important part of it.
  • Example: It took half an hour for the CEO to get to the meat and potatoes of his speech.

Not my cup of tea

  • How to use it: [something] is not [a person's] cup of tea
  • Explanation: Something that is not your cup of tea is something you do not like.
  • Example: Playing sports is really not my cup of tea. I prefer listening to music.

Out to lunch

  • How to use it: [someone] is out to lunch
  • Explanation: Someone who is out to lunch is a bit crazy or strange.
  • Example: The new manager is a bit out to lunch. I don’t think he will be working here much longer

Smart cookie

  • How to use it: [someone] is a smart cookie
  • Explanation: Someone who is a smart cookie is very intelligent.
  • Example: The new manager is a smart cookie. She knows the computer system very well.

The munchies

  • How to use it: [someone] has or gets the munchies
  • Explanation: When you have the munchies, you are hungry.
  • Example: I get the munchies after a night of drinking.

Veg out

  • How to use it: [someone] vegges out
  • Explanation: When you veg out you relax doing nothing in particular.
  • Example: I like to spend some time at night just vegging out to relax.

Now it’s your turn. How about writing a few sentences using some of these idioms in the comment box below? I’ll review them for you!

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10 Idioms Using Parts of the Body

10 Idioms Using Parts of the Body

The garden center went belly up (like Happy’s favorite sleeping pose!

There was a garden shop in my neighborhood. They sold lots of plants, tools and other gardening supplies. But everything in there cost an arm and a leg, and after just six months, the store went belly up. My sister liked going there, despite the prices, because she has a green thumb and loves gardening. The staff was very friendly and was always willing to give her a hand. There was one salesman in particular who she liked, and she was soon head over heels for him!

For today’s free English Lesson, we are going to look at ten idioms that use words which are parts of the body. Have a look at the paragraph above once more and then check the lesson.

An arm and a leg

  • How to use it: [something] costs (or) [someone] pays an arm and a leg
  • Explanation:  Something that costs an arm and a leg is very expensive.
  • Example: It costs an arm and a leg to buy beer at a baseball stadium.

Give someone a hand

  • How to use it: [someone] gives another person a hand
  • Explanation: When you give someone a hand, you help them.
  • Example: I asked Jack to give me a hand painting the house.

Go belly up

  • How to use it: [a business] goes belly up
  • Explanation: When a business goes belly up, it goes bankrupt.
  • Example: The new café in town went belly up after just six months.

Green thumb

  • How to use it: [someone] has a green thumb
  • Explanation: Someone who has a green thumb is good at gardening.
  • Example: My mom has a green thumb and grows a lot of flowers and vegetables.

Have a memory like a sieve

  • How to use it: [someone] has a memory like a sieve
  • Explanation: When you have a memory like a sieve, you cannot remember things well.
  • Example: I was trying to remember Jack’s phone number, but I have a memory like a sieve.

Have an iron stomach

  • How to use it: [someone] has an iron stomach
  • Explanation: Someone who has an iron stomach has a strong stomach and can eat almost anything without feeling sick.
  • Example: Jack ate pizza, a donut and fried rice. He has an iron stomach.

Have no spine

  • How to use it: [someone] has no spine
  • Explanation: Someone who has no spine has no courage.
  • Example: Ted can’t confront his boss about the problem because he has no spine.

Have the upper hand

  • How to use it: [someone] has the upper hand
  • Explanation: Someone who has the upper hand has an advantage in a situation.
  • Example: The workers have the upper hand over management.

Have two left feet

  • How to use it: [someone] has two left feet
  • Explanation: Someone who has two left feet is not a good dancer.
  • Example: I don’t go to dance clubs because I have two left feet.

Heart of gold

  • How to use it: [someone] has a heart of gold
  • Explanation: Someone who has a heart of gold is kind and caring.
  • Example: David is a good guy and always willing to help someone. He has a heart of gold.

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10 Idioms Related To Animals

happy-english-fish-out-of-water-idiom

He feels like a fish out of water….

as sick as a dog 

  • How to use it: [someone] is as sick as a dog
  • Explanation: Someone who is as sick as a dog is very sick.
  • Example: Bob was as sick as a dog because he caught the flu.

cat got one’s tongue

  • How to use it: the cat got [someone's] tongue
  • Explanation: When the cat got your tongue, you are unable to speak.
  • Example: Jim was pretty quite at the party, so I asked him if the the cat had gotten his tongue.

dog days of summer

  • How to use it: [we say this about hot summer weather] These are the dog days of summer
  • Explanation: The dog days of summer are the hottest days in the summer.
  • Example: I’m getting tired of the dog days of summer.

drink like a fish

  • How to use it: [someone] drinks like a fish
  • Explanation: When you drink like a fish, you drink a large amount of alcoholic drinks.
  • Example: Cathy’s a nice person, but she drinks like a fish.

fish out of water

  • How to use it: [someone] feels like a fish out of water
  • Explanation: Someone who feels like a fish out of water is in an unfamiliar and uncomfortable situation.
  • Example: Since I don’t know the rules, I felt like a fish out of water at the stadium.

green around the gills

  • How to use it: [someone] is green around the gills
  • Explanation: Someone who is green around the gills is ill.
  • Example: Joe looked a little green around the gills so the boss sent him home.

lock horns

  • How to use it: [two people] lock horns
  • Explanation: When you lock horns with someone you argue intensly.
  • Example: Tom and his wife locked horns about the household budget again.

night owl

  • How to use it: [someone] is a night owl
  • Explanation: Someone who is a night owl likes to stay up very late at night and sleep during the day.
  • Example: Kathy is a night owl, so she is usually on Skype until 3am.

party animal

  • How to use it: [someone] is a party animal
  • Explanation: Someone who is a party animal really enoys going to clubs and bars, drinking and having fun.
  • Example: Jane is a real party animal. She’s been out late every night this week!

stuffed to the gills

  • How to use it: [someone] is stuffed to the gills
  • Explanation: When you are stuffed to the gills, you have eaten a lot of food.
  • Example: I was stuffed to the gills after eating the pizza, but it was yummy!

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