156 – Chores & Errands – English Vocabulary Lesson

156 - Chores & Errands - English Vocabulary Lesson

She’s got a lot of chores to do today!

Both chores and errands are jobs that you need to do around the house. These are personal jobs that you need to do to keep your life organized and your house clean. For today’s English lesson, let’s have a look at some of the vocabulary we use to talk about these jobs.

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Here are the example sentences:

Listen to the podcast or the check the transcript for the details

Chores:

  • Tommy hates to do the dishes when they have pasta because the dishes are hard to
    clean.
  • I don’t need to do the dishes because I just got a dishwasher.
  • We usually do the laundry on Saturday mornings.
  • If it is a sunny day, we can do the laundry and then hang the clothes outside to dry.
  • I walk my dog every morning at 6:30am.
  • Nobody likes to walk the dog in the rain.
  • Jenny walks her dogs in the park in the evening.

Errands:

  • I have to do a few errands tomorrow before going to the gym.
  • Jack was running errands when his car got a flat tire.
Yesterday’s listening challenge answer:
  • Jack thinks he may have gotten the flu!
Today’s listening challenge:
  • What’s Jenny’s problem and Jack’s solution?

If you know anyone who has trouble with this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!

Can you help me out? Please leave a review on iTunes or Stitcher. Thanks!

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Do you want to learn 365 American English Idioms? Get my book. You can download it below (a pdf) or get it for your mobile device or in paperback @ Amazon!

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154 – Use to vs. Used to vs. Would for Past Habits & States

154 - Use to vs. Used to vs. Would for Past Habits & States

I used to play music with these guys in Japan

You can use both used to and would to talk about past habits, but only for states and conditions, not actions. For today’s English lesson, let’s have a look at the difference between used to and would and how they can be used in English Conversation and writing.

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Here are the example sentences:

Listen to the podcast or the check the transcript for the details

  • I would listen to such artists as Wes Montgomery and Joe Pass all the time.
  • I would introduce them to many kinds of guitarists and musicians.
  • My grandfather would tell us stories about his life in Italy.
  • Joe would live in Brooklyn doesn’t work.
  • Joe used to live in Brooklyn.
  • Where did you use to live?
  • Did you use to like Jazz when you were in high school?
  • When did you use to go to the gym?
Yesterday’s listening challenge answer:
  • Some people say that in the old days, people took a bath just once a year, usually during the month of May. So, in June, people were “fresh” and so lots of people got married at that time..
Today’s listening challenge:
  • What did Michael used to do?

If you know anyone who has trouble with this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!

Can you help me out? Please leave a review on iTunes or Stitcher. Thanks!

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Do you want to learn 365 American English Idioms? Get my book. You can download it below (a pdf) or get it for your mobile device or in paperback @ Amazon!

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Holidays & Vacations in American English

Hi Everyone! Today I’d like to look at some vocabulary and expressions related to taking time off from work or school.

Special days in your country which have historical or religious roots are called holidays. In the USA, we have holidays like New Year’s Day, President’s day, Independence Day, etc. In most countries, some of these holidays are days of the year that the government has decided public offices and businesses should be closed. These are called national holidays.

In the USA, for most people the work week is Monday to Friday. Wednesday, which falls in the middle of the week, is often called hump day. People who have such a work week have off on the weekend, or we can say they have the weekend off. Thus for most of these people, Saturday and Sunday are their days off. Some people have different days off. Let’s look at some of this vocabulary in some example sentences:

Christmas is my favorite holiday.
The office is closed on Monday because it is a national holiday.
My work week is Monday to Friday.
Happy hump day everyone! (note that this word is used in informal conversation only)
I love having the weekend off.
I’m going to the beach tomorrow because I’m off.
I have a day off tomorrow, so I’m going the beach.

Sometimes there is a long break from work or school. Schools in the USA have breaks such as winter break, spring break, and summer vacation. In general, companies in the USA do not take such long breaks. But workers do! If you take several consecutive days off, you are taking vacation or you have vacation. People can generally take their vacation time whenever they want to. You can also say that you are going on vacation, and this phrase is also used when you travel during your time off. If you use the article “a” it means you have a trip planned which includes travel, you are going on a vacation or taking a vacation. Let’s look at some of this vocabulary in some example sentences:

The kinds are home this week because it is spring break. (or you can say they have spring break)
What are you doing during your summer vacation?
I’m taking vacation in June for a week.
I can’t wait to go on vacation
Bob and his wife are taking a vacation to Orlando

Be careful! The vocabulary for school breaks such as winter break, spring break, and summer vacation is used only when talking about school-related breaks. If you do not work for a school or are not a student, you don’t have sprng break. Also, in British English, the term holiday is used to mean time off from work. In American Englsih, holiday is NOT used this way.

This is how we talk about time off from school or work in American English. I know there are a lot of idioms and vocabulary here, so please take some time to memorize it.

Where did you go on your last vacation? Tell us about it!