How To Use Go & Come + And + Verb – English Grammar Lesson

How To Use Go & Come + And + Verb - English Grammar Lesson

I invited him to stay and have a cup of coffee.

I’ve been thinking about buying a new computer, so after work today I think I’ll go and see what they have at the electronic shop near my office. My friend Yalcin came and visited me this morning and said the shop was having a sale. Yalcin lives in Turkey, but he’s visiting New York this week. When he came this morning, I invited him to stay and have a cup of coffee. We had a fun time catching up with each other.

For today’s free English lesson, I’m going to show you how we connect verbs like go, come, and stay with other verbs using and. Have a look at the paragraph above once more and then check the lesson.

We use verbs that show movement (like go, come, and stay) followed by and verb in informal English. The basic pattern is verb 1 + and + verb 2. Verb 1 is the verb of movement, and verb 2 is another verb which generally shows the reason or purpose of the movement. The connecting word and has the meaning of in order to. For example, go and see means to go somewhere in order to see something:

  • I think I’ll go and see what they have at the electronic shop.
  • My friend Yalcin always comes and visits me when he is in New York.
  • I invited him to stay and have a cup of coffee.

It’s also possible to use the past or future forms of the verbs:

  • Jane stayed and took care of me when I was sick.
  • He came and visited me this morning.
  • I’m going and seeing what they have on sale at the store.

In American English, we usually omit and when we use come and go:

  • I think I’ll go see what they have at the electronic shop.
  • Why don’t you come visit me when you are in New York?
  • I’m going to go buy coffee after work.

What are you going to go do today? Why not try writing a few sentences using this grammar in the comment box below? I’ll review them for you!

If you know anyone who has trouble with this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!

 



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Simple Past vs. Present Perfect – American vs. British English – Grammar Lesson

Simple Past vs. Present Perfect - American vs. British English

I lost my wallet. I have looked everywhere for it, but I can’t find it. This is not the first time this has happened. I often lose things. I’ve lost keys, wallets, I even lost a new camera on a train! I don’t know why I’m so forgetful.

Today, I want to show you the difference between American English and British English when it comes to using the present perfect tense. Do you know the difference? Have a look at the paragraph one more time then check out this lesson.

Strictly speaking, we use the present perfect tense to talk about an action that happened in the past and has a connection to the present time. Take a look at this Happy English lesson for a deeper explanation of the present perfect tense As you know, present perfect tense is formed by using have + the PP Verb (past participle):

  • I’ve lost my wallet. I still do not know where my wallet is.
  • I’ve missed the bus, so I’m going to be late for the meeting.

In British English, only the present perfect tense is used in situations where an action that occurred in the recent past that has some effect on the present. In American English, however, it is more common to use the simple past in these cases. I believe this is because the focus of the sentence is on the action itself, not on the relationship between the action and the present time. Thus, these two sentences are acceptable in American English:

  • I lost my wallet.
  • I missed the bus, so I’m going to be late for the meeting.

In addition, we can use already, just and yet with the simple past or present perfect in American English. In British English, only present perfect tense can be use with already, just and yet:

  • I just finished work (or) I’ve just finished work.
  • I already ate, so I’m not hungry (or) I’ve already eaten, so I’m not hungry.
  • I didn’t see that movie yet, so don’t tell me the ending (or) I haven’t seen that movie yet

The biggest difference between American and British English is in the vocabulary, but this is one of the grammatical differences between the two.
If you know anyone who has trouble with this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!



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5 Patterns For Making Comparisons Using As…As & The Same As

5-Patterns-For-Making-Comparisons-Using-As-As-&-The-Same-As

I like sushi, but sushi in New York is not usually the same as sushi in Japan. The sushi here is as delicious looking as sushi in Japan, but it’s not as cheap as it is there. However, in some restaurants here, the atmosphere is just as nice as it is in Japan, even though the price of sake is not as low as it is there.

Today, let’s have a look at five patterns for making comparisons with as. Do you know the grammar rules? Have another look at the paragraph above and then check today’s lesson.

We use as + adjective + as to show that two things are the same. In a positive sentence we often use just to emphasize that the two things are the same.

  • Tom is as tall as Bob
  • The atmosphere is just as nice as it is in Japan
  • Today is just as cold as yesterday.

We use not as + adjective + as to show that two things are not the same.

  • Jim is not as tall as Bob. Bob is taller than Jim.
  • New York is not as expensive as Tokyo. Tokyo is more expensive than NY.
  • Today is not as cold as yesterday. Yesterday was colder than today.

We also use the same as to show that two things are the same. In a positive sentence we often use just to emphasize that the two things are the same.

  • Tom’s weight is the same as Bob’s weight.
  • The atmosphere in this restaurant is just the same as it is in Japan
  • Today’s cold temperature is the same as it was yesterday.

As well, we use the same + noun + as to show that two things are the same. In a positive sentence we often use just to emphasize that the two things are the same.

  • Tom is just the same weight as Bob.
  • This restaurant has the same atmosphere as a sushi restaurant in Japan.
  • Today, we have just the same weather as we had yesterday.

Likewise, we use not the same as or not the same + noun + as to show that two things are not the same.

  • Tom’s weight is not the same as Bob’s weight.
  • The atmosphere in this restaurant is not the same as it is in Japan
  • This restaurant does not have the same atmosphere as a sushi restaurant in Japan.
  • Today, we don’t have the same weather as we had yesterday.

Now, it’s your turn. How about writing a few sentences using this vocabulary in the comment box below? I’ll review them for you! Or, click the button on the right side to leave me a voice message. If you want to leave a voice message, be sure to say your name, where you are from, and then your message!

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If you know anyone who has trouble with this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!



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