Free English Vocabulary Lesson: Talking About Sleeping and Waking

Happy is sleeping like a log!

Happy is sleeping like a log!

A lot of doctors say that for a healthy lifestyle, you should sleep for eight hours a night. Before you go to bed, you shouldn’t eat too much or drink alcohol. In addition, you shouldn’t use a computer or electronic device at least one hour before going to bed. Try to make your bedroom a peaceful place, with no TV’s, computers, or bright lights.  Doing this may help you to fall asleep easier and sleep more deeply. You’ll wake up full of energy and get out of bed feeling refreshed.

For today’s English vocabulary lesson, I’m going to show you some of the words and phrases we use when talking about sleeping and waking.

Go to bed is an action and means to enter the bed.

  • Last night I went to bed and read my book for a little while.
  • I usually go to bed at 11:00pm.

Go to sleep or fall asleep means the process of closing your eyes and going from “awake” to “asleep.”

  • Last night I went to sleep as soon as my head hit the pillow.
  • I am so tired I could fall asleep right now.

Note that a lot of native English speakers use go to bed, go to sleep, and fall asleep with little difference in meaning. So for many people, I went to bed at 10 and I went to sleep at 10 are the same

Sleep means the state of being asleep.

  • I usually sleep for just 6 hours per night.
  • Jack said he always sleeps for 8 hours.

Wake up means the process of opening your eyes and going from “asleep” to “awake.”

  • I usually wake up at 6:15am.
  • What time did you wake up this morning?

Get up means to leave the bed.

  • I woke up at 6:15, but I didn’t get up until 7.
  • I didn’t want to get up this morning.

Here too, a lot of native English speakers use wake up and get up with little difference in meaning. So for many people, I woke up at 8 and I got up at 8 are the same.

Stay up means to be awake until a late time.

  • I stayed up until 1:00am to watch the Olympics.
  • We like to stay up late on the weekends.

Sleep late or sleep in means not to get up early in the morning.

  • I like to sleep late on the weekend.
  • I’m off tomorrow, so I think I’ll sleep in.

Oversleep is when you unexpectedly sleep later than you are supposed to.

  • I overslept this morning and was late for work.
  • Be careful not to oversleep. We have an 8:00 meeting in the morning.

You can use the idiom, sleep like a log which means to sleep very well and deeply.

  • I was so exhausted I slept like a log last night.
  • My dog didn’t notice the thunderstorm because she was sleeping like a log.

Now it’s your turn. What time do you usually wake up? What time to you go to bed? Do you like to sleep late? Use some of the phrases above and write some sentences in the comment box below.

If you know anyone who has trouble with this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!



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Practical English Lesson: How To Order A Sandwich In NYC

Roast beef, salami and cheese on a hero with lettuce and tomato. Yummy!

Roast beef, salami and cheese on a hero with lettuce and tomato. Yummy!

Everybody likes a good sandwich. They are portable, tasty, and generally not very expensive. However, a lot of people have trouble ordering a sandwich in a deli here in New York. Well, don’t worry. Today I’m going to show you how to order exactly what you like.

Most sandwiches have three components. First, we have the main ingredient(s) such as meat and/or cheese. Next, is the bread. There are several types of bread including rolls and heroes. Finally, there are the extras, like lettuce, tomato, pickles, and condiments, such as mustard mayonnaise (or just mayo), salt and pepper.

So, now that you know the parts of a sandwich, here is the pattern you’ll need to follow when ordering:

Can I please have [main ingredient(s)] on [type of bread] with [extras & condiments]?

For example,

  • Clerk: Next!
  • Michael: Can I please have roast beef and cheddar cheese on a roll with lettuce, tomato, mayo, salt and pepper?

That’s the basic pattern. What is your favorite sandwich? Using the pattern above, write it in the comment box below.

English Lesson: The Real English Conversation at a Fast Food Restaurant

Next!

Next!

The day you arrive in a big American city, like New York, on a business trip or for a new overseas post, you’re going to be hungry. Quite possibly, your first meal may be at a fast food restaurant. Here are five essential words you’ll want to remember to help you order food.

  1. Next!
  2. Meal (not ‘set’)
  3. Is that it?
  4. For here?
  5. To go?

When you walk into the shop, the clerk will greet you. They generally say, Next! with a loud, stern voice and no smile. Don’t be alarmed. They are not angry with you. This is just their usual speaking style. The politeness level of speaking used by the staff in a casual, fast food restaurant or shop is much lower than what you may be used to….

When you order in some countries, you may see the word set, like a Big Mac Set. In everyday English, the word set means a collection of items, like a set of wine glasses, a set of dishes, or a set of chopsticks. If you ask for a set in a restaurant, the clerk or waiter will not understand what you want. In the USA, we generally use phrases like Combo Meal (combo is short for combination) or Value Meal. So, a Big Mac Value Meal means you get a Big Mac, French Fries, and a drink.

The question, Is that it? is the usual way to say, “Would you like anything else?” It is often pronounced by the clerk quickly, like this: zad-IT? If you want to order something additional, now is your chance.

Once you have given your complete order, the clerk will ask, Is that for here or to go or the shorter form, for here or to go? For here means you will eat your food in the shop and they will put your food on a tray. To go means you will eat your food back in your hotel or home, and in this case, they will put your food in a bag.

By the way, the phrase take out is used when we talk about ordering food with someone, but we do not say take out to the clerk in a restaurant. For example:

  • Aki: Do you want to go to the Chinese restaurant?
  • Joe: I’m too tired to go. Let’s just do take out.

Ok, so now, let’s see these words in a sample conversation:

  • Clerk: Next!
  • Aki: Can I have a Big Mac Value Meal, please?
  • Clerk: What kind of drink?
  • Aki: Coke, please.
  • Clerk: Is that it?
  • Aki: Yes, that’s it.
  • Clerk: For here or to go?
  • Aki: To go.

That is usually how it goes in the real world. Your English textbook may have a different version. Happy Eating!



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If you know anyone who has trouble with this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them.

Thanks for studying today!

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Get Happy English eBook for iPhone / iPad or Galaxy / Android or Amazon Kindle