Free English Grammar Lesson – Using Much

I ate so much sushi last night.

I ate so much sushi last night.

I like listening to music, especially rock and jazz. I don’t listen to much country or pop music, but I to like some classical music. I don’t watch much TV, because I don’t like commercials much. Listening to music is much more enjoyable than watching TV.

A lot of people have said they have trouble with much. How about you? Today I am going to show you how to use much in your English conversation.

Much is used as a determiner before a noun, especially in a negative sentence and questions:

  • I don’t watch much TV these days.
  • Jack said he usually doesn’t drink much wine.
  • We didn’t get much snow in NYC last winter.

Keep in mind we generally don’t use much in a positive sentence, unless we use much with too and so:

  • Jane said she drank so much wine last night.
  • My dog has too much energy, so we walk her twice a day.

We also use much as a pronoun:

  • Bob said there was a lot of pizza at the party, but he didn’t eat much.
  • Joe said there was a lot of litter in the park, but I didn’t see much.

We use not much of a when we refer to someone who is not good at or doesn’t like doing something:

  • I’m not much of a beer drinker.
  • Blair said she is not much of a skier.

We also use much as an adverb meaning to a large extent:

  • We went to the club but we didn’t dance much.
  • I don’t know much about golf, do you?

It’s also possible to use much as an adverb before a comparative adjective:

  • This tomato sauce tastes much better that the one I made last week.
  • I think Jenny is much more beautiful than Blair.

We use as much as to mean the same degree as~

  • Jane said she danced as much as Maggie did.
  • Bob doesn’t work as much as Frankie does.

We use very much before a past participle in a passive sentence:

  • Brad was very much bothered by the neighbor’s barking dog.
  • We were very much worried about Jane after she lost her job.

Well, I believe I’ve covered all of the ways to use much that I can think of. How about using much in some original sentences? Post them in the comment box below!

If you know anyone who has trouble with this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!



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Free English Grammar Lesson: Using Any

happy-english-grammar-lesson-any

Do you any trouble learning English grammar? I think most people would say that there are at least one or two English grammar points that confuse them. I can’t think of any person who has tried to learn a second language that didn’t have such trouble. Well, if you have any questions about learning English, please feel free to ask me here at Happy English.

A lot of students have said they have trouble with the determiner any, so today I am going to show you how you can use any in your English conversation.

We use any to talk about a non-specific, infinite number of things.  We usually use any with a plural noun or non-countable noun in questions or negative sentences.

  • Do you have any pens?
  • I don’t have any pens.
  • Do you have any free time?
  • I don’t have any time to talk to her.

We also use any in a positive sentence with a singular countable noun or non-countable noun to mean it doesn’t matter which one, it doesn’t matter who, and it doesn’t matter what. In a conversation, we stress the word any.

  • If you ask any person in this office, they will be able to help you.
  • Jack will drink any cocktail you give him. He’s a big drinker.
  • I’ll go to any beach. I just need a vacation.
  • I told Jane she can come here any time that is convenient for her.

We can also use any in a negative sentence with a singular countable noun to mean even one. Here too, in a conversation, we stress the word any.

  • I don’t have any pen that works properly.
  • I didn’t see any laptop that I wanted to buy.
  • I can’t imagine any girl wanting to date Jack.
  • There isn’t any person in that company who could help us.

Now, it’s your turn. How about trying to use any in an original sentence in the comment box below? I’ll check it for you. There isn’t any reason not to!

If you know anyone who has trouble with this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!

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English Grammar Lesson: Some Vs. Any

I put some granola on the yogurt for breakfast.

I put some granola on the yogurt for breakfast.

I had some free time today so I thought I would go shopping. I didn’t have any milk at home, so I needed to find somewhere to buy it. When I got to the store I realized I forgot my wallet, and I didn’t have any money. I walked back home, but it was so hot I didn’t have any energy left to go out again.

Do you know how to use some and any? A lot of people have trouble with this kind of English grammar, but today I am going to show you how to use these words.

In sentences, some and any are used as determiners before a noun. We usually use some in a positive sentence, and any in a negative sentence, like this:

  • Jack has some time tomorrow. I think I will ask him for help.
  • There are some cookies in the closet.
  • Some people in my office speak Japanese.
  • Jack doesn’t have any time tomorrow. I think I will help him.
  • There aren’t any cookies in the closet.
  • There aren’t any people in my office who speak French.

We usually use any in questions:

  • Do you have any free time tomorrow?
  • Are there any cookies in the closet?
  • Do any of your coworkers speak Arabic?

But, when we ask for or offer things, we usually use some:

  • Can I have some coffee?
  • Can you give me some information about the lessons?
  • Would you like some iced tea?
  • Would you care for some cake?

It is also possible to use any and some alone, without a noun. In this way, some and any function like a pronoun:

  • I don’t have any milk. Do you have any?
  • Jack said he doesn’t have blank CDs. Does Jim have any?
  • I just had a glass of iced tea. Would you like some?
  • I heard you have a lot of cookies. Can I have some?

The above rules also work for something, somebody, someone, anything, anybody, and anyone.

  • There is something in the oven. It smells good.
  • I need somebody to pick me up at the airport.
  • Is anyone working late tonight?
  • Do you need anything from the convenience store?

Now, it’s your turn! Try using some and any in an original sentence. Write your sentences in the comment box below!

If you know anyone who has trouble with this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!

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