How To Use While & As To Talk About Time

How To Use While & As To Talk About Time

As he stood up, he hit his head on the ceiling.

While I was traveling to the office, I decided to take a nap on the train. Just as I started to fall asleep, some teenagers got sat in the seat behind me. They were talking loudly and laughing, even though it was just 7:30 in the morning! I was so upset, but as I turned around to ask them to be quiet, the man next to them scolded them and they shut up. I was lucky!

For today’s English lesson, I’m going to show you how to use the conjunctions while and as to talk about time. Specifically, we use while and as to show two things that happen at the same time.

We use as to mean, “at the moment” or “when.” Thus, as generally refers to one point in time, or an action that happens at one point in time. The grammar is as + subject + verb:

  • As I stood up, I began to feel dizzy. “At the moment I stood up….”
  • As I opened the window, the air conditioner fell out. “When I opened the window…”
  • As I turned around to ask them to be quite, the man next to them scolded them.

We use just as to emphasize the moment that something happens:

  • Just as he finished his speech, everyone stood and applauded loudly.
  • Let’s all say “Happy Birthday” just as she walks in the room.
  • Just as we pulled out of the drive way, I realized I had left my wallet on the kitchen table.

We use while to mean, “during some activity.” Thus, while generally refers to some activity that happens over a period of time. The grammar is while + subject + verb or while + gerund:

  • While I was working, the phone rang many times. “During the time I was working….”
  • While having dinner, I generally don’t watch TV. “During the time I am having dinner….”
  • While I was traveling to the office, I decided to take a nap on the train.

How about writing a few sentences using as & while in the comment box below? I’ll review them for you!
If you know anyone who has trouble with this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!
 



Enter email address:

 
Check out my books in Paperback @ Amazon.com  ►►
 
Get my FREE iPhone / iPad APP  ►►

One-Point English Grammar Lesson: Because vs. Because of

A few days ago a reader wrote to me asking for help with because and because of. Today’s one-point English grammar lesson shows the basic difference between because and because of. I hope you find this helpful!

happy-english-because-vs-because-of



Enter email address:

 

If you know anyone who has trouble with this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them.

Thanks for studying today!

English Lesson: Conjunctions And, But, So, & Because

He lives there because he loves nature!

We use conjunctions to connect two sentences. Lets look at four of the most useful conjunctions today, and, but, so, and because. Take a look at these two sentences:

  1. I woke up at 6:30am.
  2. I washed my face.

You can use and to connect both of these sentences to make one sentence. If the subject of both sentences is the same, it is not necessary to repeat the subject.

  • I woke up at 6:30 and I washed my face (or) I woke up at 6:30 and washed my face.

You can use but to connect two sentences, when the second sentence is a contrast to the first sentence. Take a look at these two sentences:

  1. It was raining.
  2. I went to the beach.

These contrasting sentences can be connected using but:

  • It was raining, but I went to the beach

You can use so to connect two sentences, when the first sentence is the reason for the action in the second sentence. Take a look at these two sentences:

  1. It was raining.
  2. I brought my umbrella.

These sentences can be connected using so:

  • It was raining, so I brought my umbrella.

You can also use because to connect two sentences, when the second sentence is the reason for the action in to the first sentence. This is the opposite of so. Take a look at these two sentences:

  1. I brought my umbrella.
  2. It was raining.

These sentences can be connected using so:

  • I brought my umbrella because it was raining.

I wrote this lesson because a reader on facebook requested it. If you have a request, please feel free to let me know!