How To Use “Depend” – English Vocabulary Lesson

Depend is an interesting verb in English because it has two very different meanings and uses. For today’s free English Lesson, I’m going to show you some different ways to use this English verb.

First, depend means to rely on someone or something. Depend with this meaning always needs the preposition on (depend on), and an object:

  • I depend on my students to do their homework J
  • Children depend on their parents for food, shelter, and love.
  • The museum depends on donations to continue operating.
  • We depend heavily on the internet and technology these days.

Depend also means do be controlled or determined by something. You can use depend this way with the preposition on (depend on), and an object or without an object, but the object should be explained in the conversation:

  • Do I like spicy food? Well it depends. If the spice is not too extreme I can eat it.
  • I want to go to the beach tomorrow but it depends on the weather.
  • Jack said he wants to get a new car, but it really depends on the price.
  • I’ll can pick you up at the station, but it depends on the time.

Well, I hope you found this lesson helpful. Now its your turn. How about writing a few sentences using depend in the comment box below? I’ll review them for you!

If you know anyone who has trouble with this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!

 



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Beside vs Besides – Confusing Vocabulary

There is a nice café in the building beside the building that my office is in. Besides coffee, they have some nice pastries and cakes, as well as nice New York style bagels. Beside the café, there is a donut shop. I’m not a big fan of donuts. I think they are too sweet, and besides that, they are fattening!

For today’s free English Lesson, we are going to look at two prepositions that are often confused, beside and besides. Have a look at the paragraph above once more and then check the lesson.

Beside means next to and we use generally use beside to show the physical location of something:

  • There is a nice café in the building beside the building that my office is in.
  • John is standing beside his boss in the photo.
  • I put the printer beside my desk in the office.

Besides means in addition to:

  • Besides coffee, they have some nice pastries and cakes.
  • Besides being sweet, I think donuts are not healthy.
  • Besides tennis, Jack plays golf and soccer.

Now it’s your turn. How about writing a few sentences using beside and besides in the comment box below? I’ll review them for you!

 



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Famous, Popular, Notorious – Confusing English Word Lesson

Famous, Popular, Notorious - Confusing English Word Lesson

Times Square is both famous and popular!

There are many famous sightseeing places in New York City. Some of the most popular ones are Times Square, the Statue of Liberty, and the Empire State Building. Just twenty-fine years ago, Times Square was notorious as a gathering place of drug dealers and prostitutes, but now it is the most popular place for families to visit. One of the nice but les famous spots that I like is the rooftop of the Metropolitan Museum (the MET). It’s got a great view of Central Park!

For today’s free English Lesson, we are going to look at two words that are often confused, famous and popular, and I will also show you a related word, notorious. Have a look at the paragraph above once more and then check the lesson.

When something or someone is famous, it or they are well known, in other words many people know it or them:

  • There are many famous sightseeing places in New York City.
  • Johnny Depp is a famous actor.
  • The Magnolia Bakery is famous for it’s cupcakes.

When something or someone is popular, it or they are liked by many people. Popular things and people are admired and/or enjoyed by many people:

  • Times Square is a popular place for families to visit.
  • Star Wars was released in the 1970’s,. but it is still popular.
  • Dance clubs are popular with college students.

On the other hand, notorious people or places are well know for something bad, a bad quality or in the case of a notorious person, a bad action:

  • Times Square was notorious as a gathering place of drug dealers and prostitutes
  • Adolf Hitler was one of the most notorious historical figures of the twentieth century.
  • The Godfather movie depicts several notorious gangsters of the 1940’s in New York.

Now it’s your turn. How about writing a few sentences using this vocabulary in the comment box below? I’ll review them for you!

If you know anyone who has trouble with this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!

Want to learn English idioms offline? Check out my eBooks:

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