Four Money-Related Idioms With Make

happy-english-money-idioms-make

They have to make do in a small apartment.

My cousin Suzy has a good job, and makes a living doing computer work. She moved to Manhattan two years ago, but she soon found it hard to make ends meet living alone there, so she decided to get a roommate to help pay the rent. Her roommate makes money in sales, so she can afford half of the rent. The problem is that the apartment is not big, so they have to make do with living in a small space.

For today’s free English lesson, I want to show you four English phrases related to money that use the word make. Have a look at the paragraph above once more and then check out the lesson.

Make money means to earn or get money. It has a positive nuance of earning a good or high profit:

  • Lori makes a lot of money selling stuff on eBay.
  • It’s hard to make money working as a musician.
  • Momo made money in the stock market and bought a nice house.

Make a living means to earn money to live and support oneself and/or a family. We often use a gerund (VerbING) or as + noun after make a living:

  • Jack makes a living selling used cars.
  • I think it would be tough to make a living as an artist.
  • Tommy makes a living doing accounting.

Make do or make do with + object means to manage with a limited amount of something, like money, or an inadequate thing, like an old car.

  • Danny doesn’t have a job now, so he has to make do with his savings.
  • We can’t afford a new car, so we’ll have to make do with this old car until we can save enough to get a new car.
  • We only brought two bottles of lemonade to the picnic. I didn’t realize Ken’s family is also going to join us so we’ll just have to make do.

Make ends meet means to earn just enough money to be able to pay one’s bills. Literally, it means to live and budget one’s money, so that the end of the money and the end of the bills meet at the same time.

  • Chris and his wife just bought a house, so they are working really hard to make ends meet.
  • After the landlord raised the rent, Jenny started working a part time job in order to make ends meet.
  • Eddie couldn’t make ends meet living alone in Manhattan, so he decided to get a roommate to help pay the rent.

If you know anyone who has trouble with this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!

Do you want to learn 365 American English Idioms? Get my book. You can download it here (a pdf) for the special price of $1.75 (with Audio lessons) (offer ends May 14th) Or, you can get it for your mobile device or in paperback

 



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How Not To Use Ain’t – Conversational English Lesson

Alicia Keys – If I Ain’t Got You

In this paragraph I am going to use the word ain’t. Ain’t is considered to be non-standard English, but since it shows up in a lot of pop songs and English movies, I thought for today’s lesson, I would show you what it means and how it’s used. If you ain’t heard of this word, I can understand it because is ain’t a usual word that you will see in a typical English lesson. But as many of my readers know, Happy English ain’t a typical English lesson and I ain’t got no plans to make it one! Ain’t was widely used in the 18th century, and these days it can be found in informal English conversations. Many people feel that it is not a valid English word, despite how much it is used.

The word ain’t is a contraction of am not, are not, and is not. Ain’t is for every subject. Thus, you can say:

  • I ain’t interested in football.
  • We ain’t interested in football.
  • He ain’t interested in football.

It’s also possible to use ain’t in a yes/no question

  • Ain’t we going to the beach today?
  • Ain’t he supposed to be wearing a seatbelt?
  • You like my new idea? Ain’t I so smart?!

We also use ain’t got, which means don’t have.

  • I ain’t got enough money to buy a new car.
  • Jack said he ain’t got enough time to finish the project this week.
  • I opened the fridge, and we ain’t got anthing to eat. I’m going shopping.

So, these are all the ways you should not use ain’t. Like some other kinds of slang, I think this is good to know, but not necessarily good to use…
If you know anyone who has trouble with this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!
 



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How To Use “Do Me A Favor” Definition – English Phrase Lesson

How To Use “Do Me A Favor” Definition - English Phrase Lesson

The phrases Do me a favor and Can you do me a favor? are very useful in everyday conversational English. Whenever you need a person’s help, and you want to ask them for help, you can use one of these phrases before you say your request. Saying Do me a favor and Can you do me a favor? makes your request less direct, and is also a signal to let the listener know that you are going to ask them for help. Here are a few examples:

In the office

  • Bob: Hey Jack. Can you do me a favor?
  • Jack: Sure Bob, what’s up?
  • Bob: I want to move this table to the back of the room. Can you help me?
  • Jack: Sure. Let’s do it!

On the telephone:

  • Jen: Hello?
  • Dan: Hi Jen. It’s me, Dan.
  • Jen: Oh Dan. I’m glad you called. Do me a favor. Tell your sister that I wasn’t able to find the makeup she asked me for. I tried to call her but the line is busy.
  • Dan: Ok, I’ll let her know.

At the department store:

  • Cashier: Ok, your total is $35.40. Will that be cash or charge.
  • Customer: Charge please. And can you do me a favor? It’s a gift, so can you giftwrap it?
  • Cashier: Yes, of course.

At the train station

  • Chris: I need to by a ticket. Do me a favor. Hold my bag.
  • Joe: Ok!

If you know anyone who has trouble with this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!
 



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