How To Use Do – English Grammar Lesson

How To Use Do – English Grammar Lesson

Do you like to study English, or do you have to learn English for school, and exam, or work? You can do a lot of things when you know a second language, and English is one of the most widely spoken languages these days. Contrary to what you may think, I do like to study languages too. I find it interesting how people communicate, and I think learning a new culture through language is interesting. Don’t you?

For today’s free English Lesson, I’m going to show you some different ways to use the verb do. Have a look at the paragraph above once more and then check the lesson.

The word do in English is an auxiliary verb. We also call it a helping verb, because it helps the main verb of the sentence. We use do to form the negative form of ordinary (non-auxiliary) verbs. The negative form is do + not + verb. Of course we generally use the contracted form of do not, which is don’t. The contracted form of does not is doesn’t:

  • I like pizza, but I really do not like pasta (or) …I really don’t like pasta
  • We live in New York. Our cousin does not live very close to us (or) … doesn’t live very close to us.
  • I do not watch a lot of TV because I work until 10pm (or) I don’t watch

Be careful! We do not use do to form the negative of other auxiliary verbs:

  • “I can not play tennis” is ok, but “I do not can play tennis” is not correct.
  • “I may not go to the party” is ok, but “I don’t may go to the party” is not correct.

We also use do when we form yes/no questions. The grammar is do + subject + verb:

  • Do you like pizza?
  • Does Jack have an extra tennis racket?
  • Did they meet you at the mall?

Do also has a non-auxiliary use, and there are a lot of collocations with do, especially with some sports. Some examples of collocations are do the dishes (wash the dishes) do laundry (wash dirty clothes) and do homework.

  • Lori does yoga on Sundays.
  • Akira did kendo in high school.
  • Jen cooks, and Joe always does the dishes.
  • Make sure you do your homework before watching TV.

It is also possible to use the auxiliary verb do with the non-auxiliary verb do:

  • Tom didn’t do his homework and the teacher got angry.
  • Did you do anything fun last weekend?
  • Don’t do that!

We also use do to replace a verb that was just used:

  • I washed the car today. I do it once a month.
  • I always exercise in the morning, but today I did it after lunch.
  • Jack was singing again in the office. I hate it when he does that.

Lastly, we use do for emphasis before the main verb in a sentence.

  • Wow! You do like pizza. You at five slices!
  • Oh, don’t worry. Jane does like you. She told me so yesterday.
  • I’m sorry, but I do need to go home now. It’s late.

Well, I hope you found this lesson helpful. I do need to go do more homework, so how about writing a few sentences using do in the comment box below? I’ll review them for you!

If you know anyone who has trouble with this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!

 



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English Lesson: Using Need To & Must for Advice & Obligation

Study Abroad in the USA!

If you want to come to the USA to study English, I have some advice for you. First of all, you should decide which city you would like to study in. Of course I think New York City is the best destination for international students, but because NYC is so popular, it is a popular destination for study abroad. So, you ought to consider a smaller city in a less popular place. In a small town, you are less likely to run into other students from your country. I think you need to carefully consider your options. You need to apply for your visa at least three to six months before you are planning to begin studying, and when you do, you must make sure you submit all of the required documents. If you don’t, you might experience a delay.

We use need to when we give advice, and must to talk about obligation. Do you know how to use these words? Have a look at the paragraph above and then check out today’s lesson: 

Yesterday, we talked about using should and ought to when we give advice. We also use need to + base verb when we give advice. Need to is stronger than should and ought to. For negative sentences, in American English, we usually use don’t need to + base verb. We rarely use need not or needn’t, except in very formal conversations. Here are some examples:

  • I think you need to carefully consider your options.
  • You need to choose a school that has a good reputation.
  • If you work with a study abroad agency, you don’t need to worry about making a mistake on your visa application. The agency will make sure everything is ok before sending the documents.

We use must when we talk about obligation. We use must + base verb in positive sentences, and must + not + base verb in negative sentences. Notice the difference in meaning in the following sentences:

  • You must have a student visa to be a full time student in the USA. Using must means you have no choice. If you do not have a student visa, you cannot be a full time student in the USA.
  • You need to apply for your visa at least three to six months before you are planning to begin studying. Using need to means it is a strong suggestion to apply for a student visa at least three to six months before the date you plan to begin studies. However, this is only a strong suggestion, and it is not mandatory for you to do so.

Here are some other examples using must. All of these things are obligatory:

  • You must have a valid passport and your school’s I-20 form when you apply for a student visa.
  • You must sign the bottom of your I-20 form before submitting it with your visa application.
  • You must present your passport and I-20 form to the immigration officer when you enter the USA.

It seems like a lot of work to get a student visa, but you don’t need to worry. As long as you have all of the correct paperwork, the visa application process should go smoothly. Thanks for studying with me today!

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English Lesson: Using Should & Ought to for Advice

I saw my friend Pete there other day. He looked really tired. He told me that he had been working a lot of overtime and because of that, he’s hasn’t been eating right. I told him he should be careful. I think he ought to try to bring his lunch from home, this way he can avoid eating fast food every day. Even if you get really busy, you shouldn’t end up eating junk food.

When you give someone advice, you can use should and ought to.  Do you know how to use these words? Have a look at the paragraph above and then check out today’s lesson: 

We use should when we give advice. The structure is should + base verb. In a negative sentence, the structure is should not + base verb, and we usually use shouldn’t + base verb. Check these examples:         

  • I told him he should be careful.
  • You should look both ways before crossing the street.
  • Even if you get really busy, you shouldn’t end up eating junk food.

We also use ought to when we give advice. The structure is ought to + base verb. In American English, we generally pronounce ought to as “awdda.” Important! We don’t use ought to in a negative sentence. Check these examples:

  • I think he ought to try to bring his lunch from home.
  • You ought to listen to classical music if you want to relax.
  • If you want to lose weight, you ought to cut out snacks and junk food.

Happy (my dog) just started barking. I ought to check on her. If you have any advice on how to keep a dog from barking, please let me know. Thanks for studying today!

NEW for 2012! 109 Phrasal Verbs – 116-page eBook
Including…

  • The DEFINITION of each phrasal verb.
  • How to USE the phrasal verb.
  • The STRUCTURE showing the grammar pattern of the phrasal verb.
  • EXAMPLE sentences to see how the phrasal verb is used in context.
  • A PRACTICE question to give you the chance to use the phrasal verb.

Just $5!
Would you like a FREE 15-page sample? Click here for more information.