70 – Good vs Well – Confusing English Words Lesson

70 - Good vs Well - Confusing English Words Lesson

I know New York well

Good & well are two similar words, but good is an adjective and well is an adverb. For today’s English lesson, I’m going to show you how you can use good & well in your conversations and writing.
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Here are the example sentences:

Good is an adjective:

  • The pizza there is so good. It is really good pizza.
  • They use good ingredients to make the pizza.
  • I think Bon Jovi is a good singer.

Well is an adverb:

  • I know pizza well.
  • The pizza is made well.
  • I think Bon Jovi sings very well.

Other example sentences:

  • The leather seats in the car feel so good.
  • The pizza tastes good.
  • These roses smell so good.
  • I’m not feeling well. I think I should go home early.
  • After a week with the flu, Jane is starting to feel well again.
  • Your new hairstyle looks good!
  • I love how you changed your garden. It looks good.
  • Mary looks good today. (This means she looks attractive, pretty, etc.)
  • Mary looks well today. (This means she looks healthy. Perhaps she was ill
  • yesterday.)
  • It’s my birthday today and I feel good.
  • Jane felt good after she took the headache medicine.
Yesterday’s listening challenge answer:
  • The corrected sentence: “I went there to eat lunch”
  • Michael went out for ice cream after dinner last night
Today’s listening challenge:
  • According to the conversation, what’s new with Jack?

If you know anyone who has trouble with this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!

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58 – Early, Fast, & Quickly – Confusing English Vocabulary Lesson

happy-english-early-fast-quickly-lesson

Early, fast, and quickly can be confusing to use, but for today’s English lesson, I’m going to show you how these three words can be used in an English conversation or in writing.
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Here are the example sentences:

Sometimes early is an adjective:
I ate an early dinner.
I have an early meeting with a client tomorrow.
I think Jack has an early flight.
Sometimes early is an adverb:
I ate dinner early yesterday.
I will go to work early tomorrow because I have a meeting at 8 a.m.
Jack’s flight left early.
Sometimes fast is an adjective:
Jack’s new car is very fast, especially on the highway.
I don’t have a lot of time today, so I need a fast lunch.
Thanks for your fast reply.
Sometimes fast is an adverb:
Jack drives his new car fast, especially on the highway.
That restaurant doesn’t serve its customers very fast.
I like working with Jenny. She always replies fast.
Quickly is only an adverb:
I ate dinner quickly because I had plans to meet a friend for a movie.

Yesterday’s listening challenge answer:
  • Michael doesn’t know how the weather is because his office doesn’t have a window!
  • At lunch time Michael bumped into an old coworker.
Today’s listening challenge:
  • Why doesn’t Mike sleep late?

Please feel free to write your answers in the comment box below.
If you know anyone who has trouble with this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!
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Do you want to learn 365 American English Idioms? Get my book. You can download it below (a pdf) or get it for your mobile device or in paperback @ Amazon!

 

Check out my eBooks & Paperbacks @ Amazon.com  ►► Get my FREE iPhone / iPad APP  ►► eBooks on iTunes  ►► eBooks on Google Play  ►► eBooks on Kobo for Sony Reader ►►

53 – Like vs As – English Grammar Lesson

happy-english-lesson-like-as

Like and as can be confusing for a lot of english learners. Today, let’s have a look at these two words and see how they can be used in an English conversation.
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Here are the example sentences:

Like can be used as a preposition to show similarity, and is followed by a noun or pronoun:

  • Someone recently said Happy looks like a corgi.
  • The baby looks just like his mother.
  • Some people say rabbit tastes like chicken.

As can be used to show similarity, and is followed by a subject and verb.

  • London is expensive, as New York is.
  • Tommy is a good singer, just as his father is.

In casual English, we usually use like:

  • London is expensive, like New York is.
  • Tommy is a good singer, just like his father is.

We also use as…as to show that two things or people are equal.

  • Jack is as tall as his father.
  • Today is as hot as yesterday.

You can use just to emphasize the sameness:

  • Jack is just as tall as his father.
  • Today is just as hot as yesterday.
Yesterday’s listening challenge answer:
  • Example: I expect the train to be here at 5:00. I hope it is not late!
Today’s listening challenge:
  • Based on today’s lesson, write a sentence with like and another with as in the comment box below. I’ll check it for you!

Please feel free to write your answers in the comment box below.
If you know anyone who has trouble with this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!
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Do you want to learn 365 American English Idioms? Get my book. You can download it below (a pdf) or get it for your mobile device or in paperback @ Amazon!

 

Check out my eBooks & Paperbacks @ Amazon.com  ►► Get my FREE iPhone / iPad APP  ►► eBooks on iTunes  ►► eBooks on Google Play  ►► eBooks on Kobo for Sony Reader ►►