Adverb Lesson – Instead of Very, Use Fairly, Pretty, Quite, & Rather

Adverbs Lesson - Instead of Very, Use Fairly, Pretty, Quite, & Rather

This winter has been pretty cold…

The weather here in NY has been quite cold recently. Usually, winters here in the Big Apple are fairly cold and snowy, but this year we’ve had pretty cold temperatures and a rather large amount of snow. I’m very tired of this weather, and hoping spring will come soon…

I’m sure a lot of Happy English readers know how to use very, but there are a few other words that you can use in your everyday English that function just like very. I’m going to show you these words today.

Fairly is the weakest of these adverbs. We use fairly before an adjective or another adverb:

  • Jack plays golf fairly well, considering he just started playing last year.
  • Jenny’s French is fairly good. I’m sure she’ll have no trouble during her business trip to Paris.

Quite is a bit stronger than fairly, and can also be used before verbs and nouns. Using quite before a verb or noun is more common in British English than American English.

  • I was quite tired last night so I went straight to bed.
  • Paul knows football quite well, so if you want to know the rules, just ask him.
  • I quite like spending time with Jenny. She’s a very interesting person.
  • It’s quite a shame that they only stayed in NYC for four nights. That’s not a lot of time to see everything.

Pretty and rather are both stronger than quite, and about the same level as each other. Rather is more formal and pretty is more informal. Like quite, rather can be used before verbs and nouns and this usage is more common in British English than American English.

  • That musical was rather boring. I wouldn’t see it if I were you.
  • The food in that restaurant was good, but it was rather expensive.
  • I rather like going to classical concerts.
  • Not seeing Jane when she came to NYC was rather a disappointment.

Pretty is only used before an adjective or another adverb. The degree is the same as rather, but again, pretty is informal.

  • That musical was pretty boring. I wouldn’t see it if I were you.
  • The food in that restaurant was good, but it was pretty expensive.
  • The view from the top of that building is pretty nice.

Now, it’s your turn. How about writing a few sentences using this vocabulary in the comment box below? I’ll review them for you! Or, click the button on the right side to leave me a voice message. If you want to leave a voice message, be sure to say your name, where you are from, and then your message!

English Grammar Quiz – Frequency Adverbs

Take a look at the quiz below and write your answers in the comment box

happy-english-grammar-quiz-frequency-adverbs-verb happy-english-grammar-quiz-frequency-adverbs-be

Free English Grammar Lesson: Using Ever

This was the best pizza ever!

This was the best pizza ever!

A lot of readers and students have asked me how to use ever. Today, I am going to show you the various ways we can use this convenient English word. We’ll also look at the typical grammar patterns used with ever.

Ever is an adverb and means at any time. I am sure you have learned that we use ever with questions and the present perfect tense:

  • Have you ever gone to Brazil?
  • Have you ever heard of David Gilmour?

There are a number of other ways in English that you can use ever.

We usually use ever in questions and negative sentences:

  • You eat a bagel every morning. Do you ever get tired of it?
  • The last time we met, you told me you lost your watch. Did you ever find it?
  • Nobody ever invites the boss out for dinner.
  • I don’t ever want to hear you say those bad words again!

In negative sentences, never is more common than ever:

  • The guys in the office never invite the boss out for dinner.
  • I never want to hear you say those bad words again!

We also use hardly ever, which means almost never:

  • I hardly ever go bowling.
  • Jack said his boss hardly ever gives anyone a compliment.

We also use ever in an if clause:

  • If you ever come to New York, let me know. I’ll show you around.
  • If I ever see my ex-girlfriend again, I’ll be so upset.

Ever is also used in a comparative [ ~ than ever] or superlative [~est + noun+ ever] sentence

  • Bob’s grandfather is 94 years old, but he is stronger than ever.
  • That was the best pizza ever!

In a similar way, we also use ever with as [as + adj + as ever]:

  • Bob’s grandfather is 94 years old, but he is as strong as ever.
  • I worked 15 hours yesterday. I was as tired as ever

Ever is also used with only [only + noun + ever]:

  • The Jack is the only guy ever to have lunch with the CEO.
  • Lori is the only person ever in my family to meet a famous movie star.

Now, it’s your turn. How about trying to use even in an original sentence in the comment box below? I’ll check it for you.