86 – Safe, Safety, & Safely – Confusing English Words

happy-english-safe-safety-safely-lesson

NYC is a pretty safe city

Safe, safety, & safely are confusing words for a lot of English learners. For today’s English lesson, let’s have a look at the difference between these three words and how you can use them your English conversations and writing.

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Here are the example sentences:

Safe is an adjective:
These days, New York is a safe city
The government has done many things to make the city safe for everyone.
The subways are safe at night, too!
You can feel safe riding a taxi in New York.

Safety is a noun:
Safety is a big concern for a lot of people.
The railroad cares about the comfort and safety of the passengers.
Your safety is important to us.

Safely is an adverb:
You can safely ride the subway in New York at night.
If you safely use this gas stove, you’ll have no problems.
Please drive safely. It’s raining very hard.

Yesterday’s listening challenge answer:
  • There are four different ways do we use let it/something/someone go.
Today’s listening challenge:
  • Based on the talk at the beginning of this podcast, how do you feel about New York City?

If you know anyone who has trouble with this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!

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Do you want to learn 365 American English Idioms? Get my book. You can download it below (a pdf) or get it for your mobile device or in paperback @ Amazon!

 

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84 – Hard vs. Hardly – Confusing English Words Lesson

84 - Hard vs. Hardly - Confusing English Words Lesson

It was hard to eat the dessert because….

Hard & hardly are two English words that are often confusing to use for a lot of English learners. Hard is both an adjective and an adverb, and then we have hardly, which is also an adverb. For today’s English lesson, I’m going to show you how to use hard & hardly in your English conversations and writing.
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Here are the example sentences:

Many adjectives have a corresponding adverb form:
Tommy is a quick runner…Tommy runs quickly.
Jane is a beautiful dancer….She dances beautifully.
Jack is a slow worker….He works slowly.
Hard as an adjective (1):
The sofa is soft, but the table is hard.
The bread became hard because I forgot to put it in a plastic bag.
I think this steel is too hard to drill through.

Hard as an adjective (2):
It was a hard exam, but I was able to get a good score.
Having a pet is hard, but I love my dog.
Jack’s wife was cheating on him. That’s a hard situation to deal with.

Hard as an adverb:
It was raining hard all afternoon.
Nick works hard every day in his office.
If you study hard, you will be able to speak English well!

Hardly as an adverb:
Jack hardly worked at all today. Jack did almost no work, he barely worked.
I hardly studied for the exam. I barely studied, I only studied very little.
Jenny has the flu, so she hardly ate anything. She barely ate anything, she ate almost nothing.

Yesterday’s listening challenge answer:
  • Al mentioned that he ate very fresh squid, and then raw horse meat in Japan.
Today’s listening challenge:
  • Toward the end of today’s podcast, Michael talked about two guys and how they work. Which guy would you want to work with? Do you have anyone in your office like them?

If you know anyone who has trouble with this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!

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Do you want to learn 365 American English Idioms? Get my book. You can download it below (a pdf) or get it for your mobile device or in paperback @ Amazon!

 

Check out my eBooks & Paperbacks @ Amazon.com  ►► Get my FREE iPhone / iPad APP  ►► eBooks on iTunes  ►► eBooks on Google Play  ►► eBooks on Kobo for Sony Reader ►►

76 – Cute vs Pretty vs Beautiful – Confusing English Words Lesson

76 - Cute vs Pretty vs Beautiful - Confusing English Words Lesson

Do you think she is cute? How about the toys?

Cute, pretty, & beautiful are three similar words, but we use them differently in English For today’s lesson, I am going to show you how to use this English grammar in your conversations and writing.
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Here are the example sentences:

Pretty as an adjective:

  • Jane is a pretty girl, just like her mother.
  • She was wearing a pretty dress.
  • Her new hair style is very pretty.
  • Cathy has a pretty feather in her hair.
  • What a pretty flower!
  • There was such a pretty sunset tonight.

Pretty is an adverb:

  • I am pretty tired.
  • The movie was pretty bad. I didn’t enjoy it at all.

Beautiful:

  • Jane is a beautiful girl, just like her mother.
  • She was wearing a beautiful dress.
  • Her new hair style is beautiful.
  • Chris has a beautiful feather in her hair.
  • What a beautiful flower!
  • There was such a beautiful sunset tonight.

Cute:

  • Jane is cute, just like her mother.
  • Chris has a cute feather in her hair.
  • She was wearing a cute dress.

Be careful!

  • You can say, “Hello Kitty is so cute” but not”Hello Kitty is so pretty.”
  • You can say, “That’s a cute dog” but not, “That’s a pretty dog”
Yesterday’s listening challenge answer:
  • Jack was sad because he had to pay a lot for his car repair. Jane was down because she wants to have her apartment painted, but it’s expensive
Today’s listening challenge:
  • Who does Jack think is beautiful?
  • Is this sentence OK or not….and why? “Jane’s cat is so pretty”

If you know anyone who has trouble with this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!

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Do you have question about English? Are you confused about something in English? Just click the Ask me a question button on the left side of the screen and record your message. I’ll answer all voice messages in a future podcast![/container] [/content_band]

Do you want to learn 365 American English Idioms? Get my book. You can download it below (a pdf) or get it for your mobile device or in paperback @ Amazon!

 

Check out my eBooks & Paperbacks @ Amazon.com  ►► Get my FREE iPhone / iPad APP  ►► eBooks on iTunes  ►► eBooks on Google Play  ►► eBooks on Kobo for Sony Reader ►►