120 – Kind Of Vs. A Kind Of – English Grammar Lesson

120 - Kind Of Vs. A Kind Of - English Grammar Lesson

It was kind of him to recommend this bed!

Kind of and a kind of look like similar phrases, but actually in English they are very different. A lot of English learners confuse these phrases, so for today’s FREE English Podcast Lesson, I’m going to show you how you can use these phrases in your everyday English conversations and writing.

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Here are the example sentences:

Listen to the podcast or the check the transcript for the details
We use kind of + adjective:

  • I was kind of tired yesterday.
  • The bed was kind of expensive.
  • This curry is kind of spicy.

We use kind of + person:

  • It was kind of you to help me with my homework.
  • It was kind of Jack to lend me his car yesterday.
  • Can I help you find something? Yes, that’s very kind of you.

We use a kind of + noun

  • The bed is made from a kind of memory foam.
  • A smart phone is a kind of pocket computer.
  • My sister said I was a kind of crazy person to pay so much for a mattress.
Today’s listening challenge:
  • Who gave an opinion about Michael and what was that opinion?

If you know anyone who has trouble with this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!

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Do you want to learn 365 American English Idioms? Get my book. You can download it below (a pdf) or get it for your mobile device or in paperback @ Amazon!

 

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116 – Famous vs. Popular vs. Notorious – Confusing Words Lesson

In the 1970's Times Square was a notorious place!

In the 1970’s Times Square was a notorious place!

Famous & popular are similar English words, so they are often confused by a lot of English learners. For today’s English lesson, I’m going to show you the difference between these words and also a related word, notorious.
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Here are the example sentences:

Famous:

  • There are many famous sightseeing places in New York City.
  • Johnny Depp is a famous actor.
  • The Magnolia Bakery is famous for it’s cupcakes.

Popular:

  • Times Square is a popular place for families to visit.
  • Star Wars was released in the 1970’s,. but it is still popular.
  • Dance clubs are popular with college students.

Notorious:

  • Times Square was notorious as a gathering place of drug dealers and prostitutes
  • Adolf Hitler was one of the most notorious historical figures of the twentieth century.
  • The Godfather movie depicts several notorious gangsters of the 1940’s in New York.
Yesterday’s listening challenge answer:
  • Michael commutes by train, and usually the same train every day.
Today’s listening challenge:
  • How is Times square different now compared to 30 years ago?

If you know anyone who has trouble with this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!

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Do you want to learn 365 American English Idioms? Get my book. You can download it below (a pdf) or get it for your mobile device or in paperback @ Amazon!

 

Check out my eBooks & Paperbacks @ Amazon.com  ►► Get my FREE iPhone / iPad APP  ►► eBooks on iTunes  ►► eBooks on Google Play  ►► eBooks on Kobo for Sony Reader ►►

86 – Safe, Safety, & Safely – Confusing English Words

happy-english-safe-safety-safely-lesson

NYC is a pretty safe city

Safe, safety, & safely are confusing words for a lot of English learners. For today’s English lesson, let’s have a look at the difference between these three words and how you can use them your English conversations and writing.

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Here are the example sentences:

Safe is an adjective:
These days, New York is a safe city
The government has done many things to make the city safe for everyone.
The subways are safe at night, too!
You can feel safe riding a taxi in New York.

Safety is a noun:
Safety is a big concern for a lot of people.
The railroad cares about the comfort and safety of the passengers.
Your safety is important to us.

Safely is an adverb:
You can safely ride the subway in New York at night.
If you safely use this gas stove, you’ll have no problems.
Please drive safely. It’s raining very hard.

Yesterday’s listening challenge answer:
  • There are four different ways do we use let it/something/someone go.
Today’s listening challenge:
  • Based on the talk at the beginning of this podcast, how do you feel about New York City?

If you know anyone who has trouble with this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!

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Do you have question about English? Are you confused about something in English? Just click the Ask me a question button on the left side of the screen and record your message. I’ll answer all voice messages in a future podcast![/container] [/content_band]

Do you want to learn 365 American English Idioms? Get my book. You can download it below (a pdf) or get it for your mobile device or in paperback @ Amazon!

 

Check out my eBooks & Paperbacks @ Amazon.com  ►► Get my FREE iPhone / iPad APP  ►► eBooks on iTunes  ►► eBooks on Google Play  ►► eBooks on Kobo for Sony Reader ►►