Beside vs Besides – Confusing Vocabulary

There is a nice café in the building beside the building that my office is in. Besides coffee, they have some nice pastries and cakes, as well as nice New York style bagels. Beside the café, there is a donut shop. I’m not a big fan of donuts. I think they are too sweet, and besides that, they are fattening!

For today’s free English Lesson, we are going to look at two prepositions that are often confused, beside and besides. Have a look at the paragraph above once more and then check the lesson.

Beside means next to and we use generally use beside to show the physical location of something:

  • There is a nice café in the building beside the building that my office is in.
  • John is standing beside his boss in the photo.
  • I put the printer beside my desk in the office.

Besides means in addition to:

  • Besides coffee, they have some nice pastries and cakes.
  • Besides being sweet, I think donuts are not healthy.
  • Besides tennis, Jack plays golf and soccer.

Now it’s your turn. How about writing a few sentences using beside and besides in the comment box below? I’ll review them for you!

 



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10 Idioms Related To Animals

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He feels like a fish out of water….

as sick as a dog 

  • How to use it: [someone] is as sick as a dog
  • Explanation: Someone who is as sick as a dog is very sick.
  • Example: Bob was as sick as a dog because he caught the flu.

cat got one’s tongue

  • How to use it: the cat got [someone's] tongue
  • Explanation: When the cat got your tongue, you are unable to speak.
  • Example: Jim was pretty quite at the party, so I asked him if the the cat had gotten his tongue.

dog days of summer

  • How to use it: [we say this about hot summer weather] These are the dog days of summer
  • Explanation: The dog days of summer are the hottest days in the summer.
  • Example: I’m getting tired of the dog days of summer.

drink like a fish

  • How to use it: [someone] drinks like a fish
  • Explanation: When you drink like a fish, you drink a large amount of alcoholic drinks.
  • Example: Cathy’s a nice person, but she drinks like a fish.

fish out of water

  • How to use it: [someone] feels like a fish out of water
  • Explanation: Someone who feels like a fish out of water is in an unfamiliar and uncomfortable situation.
  • Example: Since I don’t know the rules, I felt like a fish out of water at the stadium.

green around the gills

  • How to use it: [someone] is green around the gills
  • Explanation: Someone who is green around the gills is ill.
  • Example: Joe looked a little green around the gills so the boss sent him home.

lock horns

  • How to use it: [two people] lock horns
  • Explanation: When you lock horns with someone you argue intensly.
  • Example: Tom and his wife locked horns about the household budget again.

night owl

  • How to use it: [someone] is a night owl
  • Explanation: Someone who is a night owl likes to stay up very late at night and sleep during the day.
  • Example: Kathy is a night owl, so she is usually on Skype until 3am.

party animal

  • How to use it: [someone] is a party animal
  • Explanation: Someone who is a party animal really enoys going to clubs and bars, drinking and having fun.
  • Example: Jane is a real party animal. She’s been out late every night this week!

stuffed to the gills

  • How to use it: [someone] is stuffed to the gills
  • Explanation: When you are stuffed to the gills, you have eaten a lot of food.
  • Example: I was stuffed to the gills after eating the pizza, but it was yummy!

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Phrasal Verb Lesson – Put Up & Put Together

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Phrasal Verb: Put Together

Meaning: To assemble.

  • I put my new desk together this morning.
  • Inexpensive furniture has to be put together.

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Phrasal Verb: Put Up

Meaning: To display something.

  • We put up the Christmas Tree in early December.
  • I put up a poster in my office.

 



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