Episode 25 – Still vs Yet – English Grammar Lesson

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Still & Yet can be tricky to use for many English learners. Let’s have a look at how these two adverbs are used in English.

Here are the example sentences

We use still when we want to show that some situation started in the past and continues to now. We use still in positive sentences and questions like this:

  • It was warm yesterday and it is still warm today.
  • I was born in New York and I still live here.
  • I remember you played tennis in high school. Do you still play?

We use yet when we want to refer to something that did not happen before now, but we think or know it will happen in the future. We use yet in negative sentences and questions like this:

  • It’s warm outside, but it is not summer yet.
  • My friends tell me I have not grown up yet.
  • I went to Vietnam once, but I haven’t been back yet.
Here are the answers to yesterday’s listening challenge questions
  • In the USA, elementary school kids play baseball and soccer
  • Michael’s sister does Karate. She also runs and does yoga twice a week
Here is today’s listening challenge question
  • What did Michael enjoy doing when he was a child?

Please feel free to write your answers in the comment box below.

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If you know anyone who has trouble with this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!

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Episode 24 – Using Play, Do, & Go To Talk About Sports

Thanks to Tomohiro Setoguchi for the photo

Thanks to Tomohiro Setoguchi for the photo

We use Play, Do, & Go to talk about sports in English, but how we use those three verbs depends on the category the sport falls into.

Here are the example sentences

The first category is for sports that are nouns and use a ball. For these, we use play:

  • Elementary school age kids play soccer and baseball.
  • I play tennis every Sunday.
  • Canadians like to play hockey.

The second category is sports that are nouns but do not use a ball.  For these sports, we use do:

  • I do yoga every day. (we can’t say, “I play yoga”)
  • Miho has been doing kendo since high school.
  • Have you every tried doing karate?

The third category is sports that are verbs. For these sports, we use “go” + the sport, or just the verb itself:

  • I go fishing with my father on the weekends. (or) I fish with my father….
  • Jack goes swimming at the lake (or) Jack swims at the lake
  • When can we go skiing?
  • I tried to surf, but it was difficult.

The last category is the exceptions. Golf is a sport that uses a ball, but the word golf is also used as a verb. So we can say:

  • I play golf on Sunday. or I go golfing on Sundays. or I golf on Sundays.

In a similar way, Bowling is also a sport that uses a ball and is a verb. So we can say:

  • I go bowling on Sundays. Or I bowl on Sundays.
Here are the answers to yesterday’s listening challenge questions
  1. In Jack’s house, his wife brings home the bacon and he stays home and takes care of the baby.
  2. Michael pigged out on hot dogs and brownies.
Here are today’s listening challenge questions
  1. In the USA, what sports do elementary school kids play?
  2. What sports does Michael’s sister do and how often?

Please feel free to write your answers in the comment box below.

Do me a favor! Please leave a review on iTunes or Stitcher?

If you know anyone who has trouble with this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!

Do you want to learn 365 American English Idioms? Get my book. You can download it below (a pdf) or get it for your mobile device or in paperback @ Amazon!

 

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Episode 23 – Pig Out & Bring Home The Bacon – Idiom Lesson

happy-english-bring-home-the-bacon

Pig Out & Bring Home the Bacon are two piggy idioms in English. For today’s English lesson, let’s have a look at these to interesting and porkish English phrases.

Here are the example sentences

Pig out is a verb, and it means to eat excessively, or eat a lot more that usual.

  1. I pigged out at the barbecue yesterday.
  2. Jack said he pigged out when he had dinner at the buffet restaurant.

When you want to talk about the food that you ate excessively, you can use pig out on, like this:

  1. I pigged out on hot dogs at the barbecue
  2. Jenny said she pigged out on potato chips while she was watching the soccer game.

When you want to talk about earning money to support a family, you can use bring home the bacon.

  1. Jack takes care of the baby and his wife brings home the bacon.
  2. Since I bring home the bacon, I make the financial decisions in my house.
Here are the answers to yesterday’s listening challenge questions
  1. Michael’s dog Happy is usually active during the day.
  2. The period of time between about 12:00am and 3:00am is called the middle of the night.
Here are today’s listening challenge questions
  1. In Jack’s house, who supports the family? What does the other spouse do?
  2. What did Michael pig out on (2 things)?

Please feel free to write your answers in the comment box below.

Do me a favor! Please leave a review on iTunes or Stitcher?

If you know anyone who has trouble with this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!

Do you want to learn 365 American English Idioms? Get my book. You can download it below (a pdf) or get it for your mobile device or in paperback @ Amazon!

 

Check out my eBooks & Paperbacks @ Amazon.com  ►► Get my FREE iPhone / iPad APP  ►► eBooks on Goole Play  ►►