The Future Progressive vs. Simple Future Tense- English Grammar Lesson

The Future Progressive vs. Simple Future Tense- English Grammar Lesson

In just a few months I’ll be relaxing by the sea

The Future Progressive Tense

It’s really cold today in NYC. As a matter of fact, it’s-14C! I don’t like the cold weather at all, so I’m going to stay warm by thinking about the summer. In just a few short months, I’m going to be relaxing on the beach, enjoying the warm sunshine. I will probably be thinking of that scene all winter!

Today, let’s have a look at the future progressive tense in English, and how it compares to using the simple future tense.

We used the future progressive tense to talk about something that will be in progress at a certain time in the future. The grammar is will + be + VerbING (or) be going to + be + VerbING. We use this English Grammar to talk about what we believe or project will happen in the future:

  • In just a few short months, I am going to be relaxing on the beach.
  • I’ll be working on the weekend, so I can’t go skiing with you.
  • I’ll be thinking about you while I’m away on business.
  • By this time next month I’ll be enjoying the breathtaking views of the Grand Canyon.

We also use the future progressive tense to talk about what happens in the normal or usual course of events. This means the event is a usual situation, and does not necessarily include a specific point in time in the future:

  • I’ll be seeing Jack at the trade show next week. Jack always attends trade shows and I expect that as usual, I will see Jack. This is different from the simple future:
  • I’m going to see Jack at the trade show next week. This means I have made plans to see Jack at the trade show next week.
  • I’ll probably see Jack at the trade show next week. This means I guess that I will see Jack at the trade show next week.

Here are a few more examples of using the future progressive tense for talking about what happens in the normal or usual course of events.

  • I’ll be seeing my sister a lot more often since she moved back to the old neighborhood.
  • I’ll be going by the library on my way to work. Do you want me to drop off your books?
  • If you need me, I’ll be working in the conference room

We also use the future progressive tense to make polite questions, generally when we want something or want to ask a favor of someone, or want some information:

  • Will you be using the car this afternoon? I need to do a few errands.
  • Will you be meeting in Room 2? I want to use that room for half an hour
  • Will you be attending the conference next week?
  • Will you be working next weekend?

Now it’s your turn. How about writing a few sentences using the future progressive in the comment box below? I’ll review them for you!

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If you know anyone who has trouble with this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!



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How To Use As If & Like – English Grammar Lesson

How To Use As If  & Like - English Grammar Lesson

It looks as if they sell a lot of spices here!

I saw a new pizza shop on Madison. It looked as if it had good pizza so I went in. Everyone working there was nice, and they treated me as if I were a long time customer. They seemed to live their jobs, and worked hard, like they were the owners themselves!

Today let’s have a look at the phrase as if & like.

We use as if to talk about how something or someone looks or seems to be.

The grammar is [noun] + verb 1 + as if + subject + verb 2. Usually, verb 1 is a verb of the senses, like look, seem, sound, etc:

  • Brad looks as if he’s been out in the cold too long.
  • Jane sounded as if she’s angry with us.
  • I feel as if I’m catching a cold. I need to go to bed early tonight.
  • The kitchen smells as if someone cooked curry.
  • You’d better bring an umbrella. It seems as if it’s going to rain.

In more informal English conversations, it’s also possible to use like, instead of as if:

  • Brad looks like he’s been out in the cold too long.
  • Jane sounded like she’s angry with us.
  • I feel like I’m catching a cold. I need to go to bed early tonight.
  • The kitchen smells like someone cooked
  • You’d better bring an umbrella. It seems like it’s going to rain.

Now it’s your turn. How about writing a few sentences using ad if or like in the comment box below? I’ll review them for you!

Want to learn English offline? Check out my eBooks:

If you know anyone who has trouble with this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!



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Phrasal Verb English Lesson: Get Away

happy-english-phrasal-verb-get-away1-5

Let’s learn the English Phrasal Verb  Get Away

Get away means to escape from somewhere or someone. For example:

  • The cat got away from her owner and ran down the stairs.
  •  The bank robbers tried to get away, but the police caught them.
  • My dog always tries to get away when it’s her bath time!

Have you tried to get away from somewhere or someone recently?

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