How to Pronounce & Write Fractions in English

How to Pronounce & Write Fractions in English

Today, let’s have a look at how to read and pronounce fractions in English. Outside of the math class and in the real world fractions are useful for buying things and talking about distance. So let’s begin! Basically, we use cardinal numbers (like 1, 2, 3, 4) to read the figure on the top of the fraction, and ordinal numbers (like third, fourth, fifth) to read the figure on the bottom of the fraction. When we write the fraction in words, we use a hyphen between the cardinal number and the ordinal number. Here are some examples:

  • We pronounce 1/3 as one-third, 1/4 as one-fourth, and 1/8 as one-eighth.

As well, “a” means “one” so:

  • We pronounce 1/3 as a third, 1/4 as a fourth, and 1/8 as an eighth (written without the hyphen.)

In English grammar, ordinal numbers are countable, so you need to add “s” to the word:

  • We pronounce 2/3 as two-thirds, 3/4 as three-fourths, and 6/8 as six-eighths.

We have special words to talk about fractions that have “2” and “4” on the bottom:

  • We pronounce 1/2 as one-half, 1/4 as one-quarter, and 3/4 as three-quarters.

Here are some examples on how you might use fractions in your English conversation”

  • Can I please have  two-thirds of a pound of chicken salad?
  • The shop is just a half mile from here. We can walk there!
  • Please cut this wood into three one and a quarter-inch strips.

Thanks for studying today!

 



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8 Verb and Preposition Combinations

Prepositions are troublesome for a lot of English language students. While there are many uses of prepositions in English, this lesson focuses on verb and preposition combinations. Unlike phrasal verbs, which have an idiomatic usage, the verb and preposition combinations presented here are just collocations. This means that they are, as I like to call them, just “set phrases.” For example, the verb listen generally takes the preposition to, as in “I like to listen to jazz.”  I hope you find this lesson helpful for studying them!

Account for
Grammar Pattern: account for [something]
Preposition Focus: We use for to indicate the purpose of accounting.
Usage: A person can account for money, or other valuable items such as the inventory of a store or warehouse.
Examples:

  • We need to account for all of the money.
  • The boss said that after the trade show, we  were unable to account for all of the laptops.

Accuse of
Grammar Pattern: accuse [someone] of
Preposition Focus: We use of to show the reason of accusing.
Usage: A person can accuse another person of doing something wrong.
Examples:

  • The boss accused Bob of missing the deadline
  • I can’t believe that Danny accused me of being rude in the meeting. I was just trying to answer his question.

Adapt to
Grammar Pattern: adapt to [something]
Preposition Focus:  We use to when we show the object of adapting.
Usage: A person can adapt to a new job, a new home, or a new living place.
Examples:

  • We can adapt this software to any environment.
  • I’m looking forward to my new assignment in New York. I think I can easily adapt to living there.

Add to
Grammar Pattern: add [something] to [something]
Preposition Focus: We use to when we show the object of adding.
Usage: A person can add something to another thing.
Examples:

  • The chef added chili to the curry.
  • Adding this modification to the software will add two weeks to the project.

Adjust to
Grammar Pattern: adjust to [something]
Preposition Focus:  We use to when we show the object of adjusting.
Usage: A person can adjust to a new job, a new home, or a new living place.
Examples:

  • Chris finally adjusted to life in New York.
  • I think it is not going to be easy for everyone to adjust to this new work schedule.

Admire for
Grammar Pattern:  admire [someone] for
Preposition Focus: We use for to indicate the purpose of admiring.
Usage: A person can admire another person for their achievement, or their special ability. Children often admire their parents and/or heroes.
Examples:

  • I admire my grandfather for his hard work.
  • Everyone admires David for his talent.

Admit to
Grammar Pattern: admit [something] to [something]
Preposition Focus: We use to when we show the object of admitting.
Usage: A person can admit to making a mistake, or failing to do something.
Examples:

  • Doug admitted his mistake to the boss.
  • I admitted that I was wrong to Jane. I think she can forgive me.

Agree on
Grammar Pattern: agree on [something]
Preposition Focus: We use on to show the target of agreeing.
Usage: A person can agree  on an idea, a proposal a time schedule, etc.
Examples:

  • We can not agree on this contract unless you change the terms.
  • I agreed on some of the proposed changes in the plan, but not all of them.

If you would like to learn over 200 more verb and preposition combinations, check out my book, now available in paperback and eBook:

  • 225 Verb & Preposition Combinations-1225-verbs-&-prepositions-ebook-audio

 



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10 Food Related Idioms – English Vocabulary

Who brings home the bacon in your family?

Who brings home the bacon in your family?

I wanted to get a cup of joe after work today, but I’m a bit tired of the usual MegaBucks coffee shop, so I went to a new café I saw the other day. It recently opened near the station, so getting there was a piece of cake. The clerk seemed to be a bit out to lunch when he took my order, and in the end, I got a nice cup of espresso for peanuts! It was a nice treat for working hard in order to bring home the bacon!

For today’s free English Lesson, we are going to look at ten idioms that use food related words. Have a look at the paragraph above once more and then check the lesson.

A cup of joe

  • How to use it:  You can buy, drink, make, etc. a cup of joe.
  • Explanation: Joe is a slang word for coffee and so a cup of joe means a cup of coffee.
  • Example: I like to start my day with a cup of joe.

A piece of cake

  • How to use it: [something] is a piece of cake
  • Explanation: Something that is a piece of cake is easy to do.
  • Example: Using computers is a piece of cake for me.

Bring home the bacon

  • How to use it: [someone] brings home the bacon
  • Explanation: When you bring home the bacon, you support your family.
  • Example: Jack brings home the bacon.

Get something for peanuts

  • How to use it: [someone] gets [something] for peanuts
  • Explanation: When you get something for peanuts, you buy it for a low price.
  • Example: I got this new computer for peanuts!

Meat and potatoes

  • How to use it: [something] is the meat and potatoes of a situation
  • Explanation: The meat and potatoes of something is the main and important part of it.
  • Example: It took half an hour for the CEO to get to the meat and potatoes of his speech.

Not my cup of tea

  • How to use it: [something] is not [a person's] cup of tea
  • Explanation: Something that is not your cup of tea is something you do not like.
  • Example: Playing sports is really not my cup of tea. I prefer listening to music.

Out to lunch

  • How to use it: [someone] is out to lunch
  • Explanation: Someone who is out to lunch is a bit crazy or strange.
  • Example: The new manager is a bit out to lunch. I don’t think he will be working here much longer

Smart cookie

  • How to use it: [someone] is a smart cookie
  • Explanation: Someone who is a smart cookie is very intelligent.
  • Example: The new manager is a smart cookie. She knows the computer system very well.

The munchies

  • How to use it: [someone] has or gets the munchies
  • Explanation: When you have the munchies, you are hungry.
  • Example: I get the munchies after a night of drinking.

Veg out

  • How to use it: [someone] vegges out
  • Explanation: When you veg out you relax doing nothing in particular.
  • Example: I like to spend some time at night just vegging out to relax.

Now it’s your turn. How about writing a few sentences using some of these idioms in the comment box below? I’ll review them for you!

Want to learn English idioms offline? Check out my Idiom Book, now in paperback!:

 



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