Cloth, Clothes, & Wear – Confusing English Nouns – Vocabulary Lesson

 

My friend Jenny is very fashionable. She always wears very nice clothes and looks stylish. She even looks great in casual wear. She could put on a pair of jeans and a sweatshirt and she would look great. When she shops, she always insists on clothes made from the finest cloth. Egyptian cotton and Italian wool are her favorites. When she walks down Fifth Ave in NYC, everyone notices her and her beautiful clothes.

For today’s free English Lesson, we are going to look at some confusing vocabulary: cloth, clothes, wear, put on, & take off. Have a look at the paragraph above and then check the lesson:

Cloth is a countable noun. The plural form is cloths; 1 cloth, 2 cloths. Cloth has basically 2 meanings. The first is a small towel or rag. In your bathroom, you probably have a washcloth that is used for washing your face. A washcloth is generally a small, square towel. I have also heard the word facecloth, but think in American English the word washcloth is more commonly used.

  • Get a cloth and wipe the table please.
  • I always use a washcloth in the morning.
  • I have a special cloth to clean my eyeglasses.

The word cloth also means material. Cloth is the material or fabric which is used to make clothes:

  • His suit is made of fine cloth from Italy.
  • I love this cloth. I think I will use it for my school project.
  • Mood is a famous cloth store in NYC!

Clothes is an uncountable noun, it is not the plural form of cloth. Clothes means the items worn on the body.

  • She always wears very nice clothes and looks stylish.
  • Sanae likes to buy clothes at Anthropology.
  • Our company CEO wears custom made clothes.

Wear is also an uncountable noun. However, as a noun, wear is only used with a modifier or descriptive word before it. As a noun, wear is never used alone. So for example, you can say, “You have nice clothes” but not, “You have nice wear:”

  • They sell formal wear and suites at that shop on Madison Ave.
  • Children’s wear is on the third floor of this department store.
  • I bought tennis wear and a racket, so I am ready to play!

Tomorrow, we’ll look at some verbs related to getting dressed. But now it’s your turn. How about writing a few sentences using this vocabulary in the comment box below? I’ll review them for you!

If you know anyone who has trouble with this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!

 



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Participle Adjectives ED vs ING – English Grammar Lesson

This teacher is boring! Everyone in the class is bored...

This teacher is boring! Everyone in the class is bored…

Last night, Jenny went to a party at her friend Blair’s house. There were a lot of people there that Jenny didn’t know, and most of them were much younger than her, so she really didn’t talk to many people. In addition, they played R&B music at the party, and Jenny prefers rock and heavy metal. After an hour, she left the party and went home. Then she called her friend Serena. Have a look at this conversation between the two friends:

  • Jenny: “Hey Serena, How’s it going?”
  • Serena: “Hi Jenny. Pretty good. What’s new?
  • Jenny: Well, I went to Blair’s party tonight
  • Serena: Oh cool! How was it?
  • Jenny: “Well, actually I was pretty boring.”
  • Serena: “Huh?”

Serena was surprised with Jenny’s answer. Do you know why? Today, we are going to look at participle adjectives. These are adjectives that are formed from the present and past participle forms of verbs. For example,

  • bore → bored  → boring
  • tire → tired  → tiring
  • excite → excited  → exciting
  • interest → interested  → interesting
  • amaze → amazed  → amazing

The past participle adjectives are words like bored, excited, interested, amazed, disappointed, etc. These adjectives that end in ED describe how a person feels about something. People are ED!

  • I was tired yesterday so I went to bed early.
  • Serena was bored in her history class.
  • I’m interested in Jazz.
  • Jack was excited when he won the lottery!

Words like boring, exciting, interesting, amazing, disappointing, etc. describe the reason a person has a certain feeling about something. Things and sometimes people are ING!

  • Work was tiring yesterday so I went to bed early.
  • Serena’s history class was boring.
  • I think jazz is interesting.
  • Winning the lottery is so exciting!

Generally things are ING, but sometimes we use ING adjectives to describe people:

  • My history teacher was so boring. He’s not an interesting teacher and makes the students feel bored.
  • My grandfather was an interesting person. He had two jobs and enjoyed painting.
  • Jack is so depressing. I don’t like talking to him because of his negative attitude.

Here are some more examples using both types of adjectives

  • The party was boring, so I was bored. I feel bored…the party is boring
  • My history teacher is boring, so I was bored in the class.
  • The roller coaster is exciting, so I am excited. I am excited. The roller coaster is exciting.
  • This lesson is interesting, so I am very interested in* it.  (*Note we use interested + in + object)

Now, it’s your turn. How about writing a few sentences using this vocabulary in the comment box below? I’ll review them for you!

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If you know anyone who has trouble with this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!



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After, Ago, Before, & In to Talk About Time – English Vocabulary Lesson

After, Ago, Before, & In to Talk About Time - English Vocabulary Lesson

After work last night I went to a little Chinese restaurant. I’ve gone there a few times before. Its pretty good and the prices are reasonable. I often try to find different restaurants because I often have out of town guests and I always want to take them somewhere good but not necessarily touristy. In fact, in three weeks another friend is coming to New York, so I need to start planning. He came here two years ago, so I want to take him somewhere new this time.

Today I want to talk about how we use after, ago, before, & in to talk about time. Have a look at the paragraph above and then check the lesson:

We use ago to talk about a point in past time which is related to now:

  • Tom came here two years ago. It means, two years before now.
  • Five years ago, I went to Mexico City.
  • I saw Brad a week ago in a deli.

We use before to talk about a point in past or future time which is related to another point in time, but not now. We often use before that, to indicate the time we are referring to. Before does not relate to now:

  • Tom came here two years ago. Before that, he had never been to the USA
  • In June I am going to Cancun. Before I go I need to renew my passport
  • I saw Brad a week ago in a deli. Before that, I saw him in a supermarket in New Jersey.

We use in to talk about a point in future time which is related to now:

  • I’ll be finished with work in an hour. It means an hour from now.
  • In three weeks another friend is coming to New York.
  • I’m going to Cancun in two months.

Finally we use after to talk about a point in past or future time which is related to another point in time, but not now. We often use after that, to indicate the time we are referring to. After does not relate to now:

  • I saw Brad a week ago in a deli. After that, we went to a café and had coffee.
  • In June I am going to Cancun. After I come back I will start planning my next trip.
  • After I finish work I’m going to go straight home.

Now, it’s your turn. How about writing a few sentences using this vocabulary in the comment box below? I’ll review them for you!
Learn 225 Verb & Preposition Combinations ►►
If you know anyone who has trouble with this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!



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