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92 – Idioms Using Hand – English Idiom Lesson

92 - Idioms Using Hand - English Idiom Lesson

Learn 5 Idioms With Hand

Using idioms makes your English sound more natural. Fopr today’s English podcast lesson, I’m going to show you five idioms that use the word hand. I hope you’ll start using them in your English conversations and writing soon!
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Here are the example sentences:

Caught red-handed:

  • Bob was caught red-handed sleeping in the office.
  • Joey’s wife caught him red-handed with another woman at a cafe.

Get out of hand:

  • Everyone was arguing at the meeting so it got out of hand.
  • The police came when the party at the college dormitory got out of hand.

Have the upper hand:

  • The workers have the upper hand over management.
  • In tonight’s baseball game, the Yankees have the upper hand.

Know something like the back of your hand:

  • I know NYC like the back of my hand because I was born and raised here.
  • Yalcin knows computers like the back of his hand. He’s an expert!

Give someone a hand:

  • I asked Jack to give me a hand painting the house.
  • We all gave the boss a hand when we moved into the new office
Yesterday’s listening challenge answer:
  • Michael had fried dumplings for lunch. That’s unusual because these days he has been trying to eat lighter and more healthy.
Today’s listening challenge:
  • Why are human hands so special in the animal world?

If you know anyone who has trouble with this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!

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Do you have question about English? Are you confused about something in English? Just click the Ask me a question button on the left side of the screen and record your message. I’ll answer all voice messages in a future podcast![/container] [/content_band]

Do you want to learn 365 American English Idioms? Get my book. You can download it below (a pdf) or get it for your mobile device or in paperback @ Amazon!

 

Check out my eBooks & Paperbacks @ Amazon.com  ►► Get my FREE iPhone / iPad APP  ►► eBooks on iTunes  ►► eBooks on Google Play  ►► eBooks on Kobo for Sony Reader ►►

91 – Take Lunch vs Have Lunch – Confusing English Words

91 - Take Lunch vs Have Lunch - Confusing English Words

I took lunch at 3pm, and I had fried dumplings!

The sentences I take lunch & I have lunch have a completely different meaning in English. For today’s English lesson, I’m going to show how to use take & have naturally in your English conversations. Check it out!

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Here are the example sentences:

Have is used to mean eat or drink:

  • Let’s have some ice cream. It’s so hot outside.
  • Do you want to have beer or wine?
  • I feel like having some coffee.

You can also use for:

  • I had a bagel for breakfast.
  • I sometimes have pasta for lunch.
  • Jack said his family usually has pizza on Fridays for dinner.

Using take:

  • Jack always takes lunch at 12:30.

We also use the phrase take a break:

  • I took a break at 3:00 and walked to the bank.
  • Let’s take a break. We’ve been working in the garden for three hours.

These sentences are not natural in English:

  • I took a cup of coffee before starting work. It should be, “I had a cup of coffee…”
  • I took some tea and a cookie for dessert. It should be, “I had some tea and a cookie…”
Yesterday’s listening challenge answer:
  • Michael ate a pan fried grasshopper once!
Today’s listening challenge:
  • What did Michael have for lunch today. Was there anything different between today’s lunch and Michael’s usual lunch these days?

If you know anyone who has trouble with this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!

[content_band style="color: #333;" bg_color="#ffddea" border="both"][container]
Do you have question about English? Are you confused about something in English? Just click the Ask me a question button on the left side of the screen and record your message. I’ll answer all voice messages in a future podcast![/container] [/content_band]

Do you want to learn 365 American English Idioms? Get my book. You can download it below (a pdf) or get it for your mobile device or in paperback @ Amazon!

 

Check out my eBooks & Paperbacks @ Amazon.com  ►► Get my FREE iPhone / iPad APP  ►► eBooks on iTunes  ►► eBooks on Google Play  ►► eBooks on Kobo for Sony Reader ►►