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Episode 36 – Five Idioms with LIKE and Animals!

happy-english-animal-idioms-with-like

Happy works like a dog!

Idioms will help your English conversation sound more natural and colorful. Today, I am going to show you five idioms that use like and animals! Check them out!

Yesterday’s listening challenge answer
  • Michael started working in international education in 1994
  • Michael prefers being self-employed!
Today’s listening challenge
  • Where did Michael have lunch?
  • Who in Michael’s family doesn’t eat much?

Please feel free to write your answers in the comment box below.

Please leave a review on iTunes or Stitcher?

If you know anyone who has trouble with this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!

Do you want to learn 365 American English Idioms? Get my book. You can download it below (a pdf) or get it for your mobile device or in paperback @ Amazon!

 

Check out my eBooks & Paperbacks @ Amazon.com  ►► Get my FREE iPhone / iPad APP  ►► eBooks on Goole Play  ►►

Episode 35 – Prepositions With WORK – English Grammar Lesson

happy-english-prepositions-with-work

I used to wear a suit to work

Prepositions in English can be troublesome and confusing. For today’s English lesson I want to show you some prepositions that come after the verb work.

Here are the example sentences

We use work at followed by a place or a task:

  • Jack works at a bank downtown.
  • The boss was working at his desk all day.
  • I had a problem with my computer and I was working at it for a few hours until it was solved.

We use work for followed by a company, a cause or a person:

  • Jack works for NYC Finance downtown.
  • Jenny has been working for animal rights all her life.
  • Teddy used to work for Jack Welch.

We use work in followed by a field or industry:

  • Jack works in finance.
  • I’ve been working in international education for more than 20 years.

We use work on followed by a task:
Jack works on finance reports for the bank.
I was working on my lessons all morning.

We use work with followed by a body part, a tool or a person:
Jack works with a computer and a financial calculator.

  • I worked with Greg and Nobi in my previous job.
  • Freddy is a plumber, so he works with his hands.

By the way, work out is also phrasal verb, which means exercise:

  • Danny works out at the health club on 53rd Street.
  • I need to start working out, but it is so difficult to get started!
Yesterday’s listening challenge answer
  • Around 300 years ago ain’t was commonly used
  • Many people think ain’t is not proper English and shouldn’t be used
Today’s listening challenge
  • What happened 20 years ago?
  • What type of work does Michael prefer?

Please feel free to write your answers in the comment box below.

Please leave a review on iTunes or Stitcher?

If you know anyone who has trouble with this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!

Do you want to learn 365 American English Idioms? Get my book. You can download it below (a pdf) or get it for your mobile device or in paperback @ Amazon!

 

Check out my eBooks & Paperbacks @ Amazon.com  ►► Get my FREE iPhone / iPad APP  ►► eBooks on Goole Play  ►►

Episode 34 – Ain’t Ain’t A Word! English Slang Words

aint-aint-a-word-happy-english

Ain’t ain’t a word.” Most parents in the USA say that sentence to their kids. Mine too! For today’s English lesson, let’s have a look at this non-standard verb and how it is used (or shouldn’t be used) in English Conversation.

Here are the example sentences

Ain’t is used for every subject. Thus, you can say:

  • I ain’t interested in football.
  • We ain’t interested in football.
  • He ain’t interested in football.

It’s also possible to use ain’t in a yes/no question

  • Ain’t we going to the beach today?
  • Ain’t he supposed to be wearing a seatbelt?
  • You like my new idea? Ain’t I so smart?!

We also use ain’t got, which means don’t have.

  • I ain’t got enough money to buy a new car.
  • Jack said he ain’t got enough time to finish the project this week.
  • I opened the fridge, and we ain’t got anthing to eat. I’m going shopping.
Yesterday’s listening challenge answer
  • Based on the information about Eddie, I think he should have waited to move to Manhattan. What do you think of his decision?
  • Eddie’s roommate is a salesperson.
Today’s listening challenge
  • What happened around 300 years ago?
  • What do many people think about ain’t?

Please feel free to write your answers in the comment box below.

Please leave a review on iTunes or Stitcher?

If you know anyone who has trouble with this English language point, why not help them out! Just share this lesson with them. Thanks for studying today!

Do you want to learn 365 American English Idioms? Get my book. You can download it below (a pdf) or get it for your mobile device or in paperback @ Amazon!

 

Check out my eBooks & Paperbacks @ Amazon.com  ►► Get my FREE iPhone / iPad APP  ►► eBooks on Goole Play  ►►