Need a new search?

If you didn't find what you were looking for, try a new search!

Feel Bad vs. Feel Bad For – English Vocabulary Lesson

Tom said he feels bad for Jack. His girlfriend left him, and he’s feeling down about it. I’m shocked because Tom is the guy who stole Jack’s girlfriend! I can’t believe he doesn’t feel bad about that. I feel bad because I totally forgot Jack’s birthday yesterday. He’s a nice guy. I hope he feels better soon.

Today, let’s have a look at the difference between feel bad and feel bad for. Do you know the difference? Look at the paragraph above once more and then check the lesson below.

You can use feel bad for + when you feel sad because the person has some misfortune or trouble:

I feel bad for Jack because his girlfriend left him.
Jenny got laid off from her job. I feel bad for her.
There was a terrible storm and many people lost their homes. I fee bad for them.

You can use feel bad for + VerbING when you feel sad because you’ve done something wrong:

I feel bad for missing your birthday party.
She said she feels bad for leaving him, but she doesn’t love him anymore.
I feel bad for breaking your nice pen. I’ll buy you a new one.

You also can use feel bad when you feel sad because you’ve done something wrong. Here, feel bad doesn’t take an object:

Oh my! I missed your birthday. I feel so bad.
I feel bad because I crashed my car into my sister’s car.
I’m sorry for what I said. I feel bad about that.

So note the phrase I feel bad is not the opposite of I feel good! Instead use, I don’t feel well.

Now, it’s your turn. How about writing a few sentences using these phrases in the comment box below? I’ll review them for you!
Learn 225 […]

How Do You Feel About Speaking English?

Our friends over at Kaplan International Colleges are really curious about your thoughts. They want to know how you feel about speaking English. Can you understand Scottish people? What’s your favorite accent?

You can tell them by answering ten simple questions and when you do, you will be entered into a prize drawing for the chance to win $100 worth of Amazon vouchers. It takes hardly any time and, who knows…you may be a winner!

Click here to begin the survey. Do it now! They’ll be publishing the results soon in an infographic and I’ll let you know when it’s out.

English Grammar Lesson: Using Feel

Yesterday, we I showed you the different ways to use seem. Today, I want to help you with another verb that can be tricky to use: feel.  I’d like to show you how we can use this verb in everyday English. There are several grammar patterns using feel, so let’s have a look at them.

First, we use feel + adjective to describe mental or physical states:

I feel hot. Can you please turn on the air conditioner?
Jack said he feels sick, so he is going to leave the office early.
This pillow feels soft! I love it!

We also use feel + like + noun to describe mental or physical states:

I didn’t sleep well last night. I feel like a zombie today.
This pillow feels like a brick. I want a softer one.

In a similar way, we can use also use feel + like + subject + verb:

I didn’t sleep well last night. I feel like I am a zombie today.
This pillow feels like it is a brick. I want a softer one.

It is also possible to use feel + as if & feel + as though with the same meaning:

I didn’t sleep well last night. I feel as though I am a zombie today.
This pillow feels as if it is a brick. I want a softer one.

We can also use feel like to mean want. After feel like you can use a gerund or noun:

I feel like eating ice cream.
We were talking about lunch and Jack said he feels like pizza. How about you?

We use feel + noun to talk about a physical perception or the sense of touch:

I felt something on my leg and it was a spider! Yuck!
Jack felt her forehead and realized she has […]